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New data on distant galaxy numbers
July 2, 2015 09:36 PM - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - SAN DIEGO, via EurekAlert.

There may be far fewer galaxies further out in the Universe then might be expected, suggests a new study based on simulations conducted using the Blue Waters supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, with resulting data transferred to SDSC Cloud at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California, San Diego, for future analysis. 

The study, published this week in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, shows the first results from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) calculations of high redshift galaxy formation. 

Moreover, these simulations show hundreds of well-resolved galaxies, allowing researchers to make several novel and verifiable predictions ahead of the October 2018 launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), a new space observatory that succeeds the Hubble Space Telescope. 

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A look at N2O: Nitrous oxide emissions may be higher than previously thought
June 22, 2015 05:01 PM - Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel

In addition to carbon dioxide there are plenty of other greenhouse gases. Nitrous oxide is one of them. However, a global assessment of emissions from the oceans is difficult because the measurement methods used so far have only allowed rough estimates. Using a new technology for continuous measurements, researchers of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel have now discovered that nitrous oxide emissions from the Southeast Pacific are much higher than previously thought. They publish their data in the international journal Nature Gesoscience.

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SPOTLIGHT

Breeders select trait to conserve drinkable water

Kaine Korzekwa, American Society of Agronomy

Plants need water. People need water. Unfortunately, there’s only so much clean water to go around — and so the effort begins to find a solution.

Luckily for people, some plants are able to make do without perfectly clean water, leaving more good water for drinking. One strategy is to use treated wastewater, containing salt leftover from the cleaning process, to water large areas of turf grass. These areas include athletic fields and golf courses. Golf courses alone use approximately 750 billion gallons of water annually in arid regions.

However, most plants cannot tolerate a lot of salt. As some areas of the United States run low on clean water, plant breeders are trying to breed plants that are more salt tolerant. This would conserve clean water while maintaining healthy turf.

Plant breeders can actually see the individual effect of what each parent plant passes on because the genes add intensity to the trait. These are additive effects. Breeders can more easily select for those features when they observe those differences.

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11 Nature-Inspired Home Design Ideas

June 29th, 2015
Overall consumer spending on eco-friendly products have increased in the United States as of 2014. Check out some products and ideas to help creatively design your home in beneficial, eco-friendly ways while preserving the beauty that nature has to offer.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

EPA study: Climate Change to Wipeout Eastern Trout, Salmon by 2100

June 23rd, 2015
According to an EPA study, in less than 90 years there will no longer be any trout or salmon east of the Mississippi River and populations in the west will only survive in the most mountainous areas. Current projections suggest climate change will render enormous swaths of habitat too warm to support these ecologically, and economically important cold-water fish.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

9 Green Air Freshener Ideas

June 17th, 2015
A fragrant home is a happy home. Rethink how you tackle the stink - commercial air fresheners are full of chemicals. Instead, go green and make your own natural air fresheners with a few of these easy alternatives!
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

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