Top Stories

Look inside your own pantry or fridge to find the top culprit of food waste
June 26, 2017 08:36 AM - Iowa State University

There is a good chance there are fresh vegetables in your refrigerator that will end up in the garbage instead of on your dinner plate.

Not that anyone goes to the grocery store with the intention of later throwing the food in the trash, but we all do it more often than we probably realize. Ruth Litchfield, a professor of food science and human nutrition at Iowa State University, says we waste about 20 pounds of food each month. And that is per person.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Lifestyle Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

Are Bidets More Environmentally Friendly Than Toilet Paper?
May 31, 2017 07:23 AM - s.e. smith, Care2

While bidets remain unpopular in America, they’re a familiar fixture in bathrooms all over the world. And they raise an inevitable question: Is it better for the environment if you wipe, or should you wash instead?

The answer may surprise you — and could lead you to rethink your next bathroom remodel.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Pollution Topic

SPOTLIGHT

Why the World's Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters

Jim Robbins, YaleEnvironment360

Vast amounts of river-borne sediment are trapped behind the world’s large dams, depriving areas downstream of material that is badly needed to build up the marshes and wetlands that act as a buffer against rising seas.

In September 2011, after 20 years of planning, workers began dismantling the Elwha and Glines dams on the Elwha River in northwestern Washington state. At the time, it was the largest dam removal project in U.S. history, and it took nearly three years for both barriers to be dismantled and for the river to once again flow freely. 

Over the course of their nearly century-long lives, the two dams collected more than 24 million cubic yards of sediment behind them, enough to fill the Seattle Seahawks football stadium eight times. And since their removal, the Elwha has taken back the trapped sediment and distributed it downstream, causing the riverine ecosystem to be rebuilt and transformed. Massive quantities of silt, sand, and gravel have been carried to the coast, resurrecting a wetlands ecosystem long deprived of sediment.

What's new on our Community Blog



Protected: How does wind turbines work?

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Protected: But what is the wind ?

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Protected: Wind Energy

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Member Press Releases

More Press Releases

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2017©. Copyright Environmental News Network