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Arctic ice growth doesn't disprove climate change
July 27, 2015 08:52 AM - Steve Williams, Care2

New data shows that in 2013 Arctic ice actually grew rather than retreating as climate change models had predicted. Far from proving climate change is a myth or that ice retreat has ended, as skeptics are now claiming, this reveals something much more interesting about our warming climate.

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Going to the beach may require hand sanitizer in addition to sunscreen
July 15, 2015 01:07 PM - American Chemical Society

“No swimming” signs have already popped up this summer along coastlines where fecal bacteria have invaded otherwise inviting waters. Some vacationers ignore the signs while others resign themselves to tanning and playing on the beach. But should those avoiding the water be wary of the sand, too? New research in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology investigates reasons why the answer could be “yes.” Sewage-contaminated coastal waters can lead to stomach aches, diarrhea and rashes for those who accidentally swallow harmful microbes or come into contact with them. But over the past decade, scientists have been finding fecal bacteria in beach sand at levels 10 to 100 times higher than in nearby seawater.

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SPOTLIGHT

Turtle Hotspots Identified Around the World Contain Diverse Species and Richness

Chelonian Conservation and Biology

Global biodiversity is becoming more threatened as the human population continues to grow and use the world’s resources. Turtles have the misfortune of being on the leading edge of biodiversity decline and serve as an indicator of ecosystem degradation.

Researchers have identified 16 turtle “hotspots” around the world. These regions host the many native species of tortoises and freshwater turtles. By focusing on such areas, conservationists can target preservation efforts where the greatest effects can be achieved.

Scientists from the Chelonian Research Foundation, Conservation International, and State University of New York at Stony Brook recently published an article in the journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology that names three types of hotspots—biodiversity hotspots, high-biodiversity wilderness areas, and turtle priority areas. Taxon richness and endemism values are offered for the 16 identified hotspots, which host 262 species, or 83 percent of all turtle species.

What's new on our Community Blog



Forest’s Ecosystem Management

July 21st, 2015
Why Preserve Forests and Plant Trees?
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Energy Consumption in Homes Across Europe

July 10th, 2015
The largest since source of energy consumption comes from buildings. This piece looks at how the EU is performing in terms of reducing energy consumption in the home and what else can be done.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Interesting Environmental Law Cases

July 6th, 2015
Protecting the environment is an increasing concern in recent times. Here are some occasions when the courts have had to intervene...
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

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