Top Stories

Shifting temperatures will affect flavors, quality of food
March 27, 2015 10:34 AM - S.E. Smith, Care2

Love scrumptious vegan pizza? You’d better enjoy it while you can, because climate change is moving in to hog a slice. According to an Australian report, Appetite for Change, climate change isn’t just going to decimate existing crops — it’s also going to change the way the survivors taste. And not in a good way. The researchers say that we’re going to be eating increasingly bland, tasteless, mushy food because of the way shifting temperatures are affecting farming, and in fact, it’s already started happening.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Ecosystems Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

Antioxidant Effects differ by Leaf Color
March 27, 2015 01:47 PM - University of the Basque Country

Lettuce, one of the indispensable vegetables in the Mediterranean diet, is a food that greatly benefits health, mainly because it is rich in antioxidants. But not all lettuce varieties have the same antioxidant effect. According to a study led by the researcher Usue Pérez-López of the Department of Plant Biology and Ecology of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Science and Technology, the colour of the leaves of these vegetables determines the speed at which their compounds act. So lettuces with green leaves have antioxidants that react more slowly while red-leaf ones have a faster effect. The results of this study have been set out in a paper "Phenolic Composition and Related Antioxidant Properties in Differently Coloured Lettuces: A Study by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Kinetics" recently published by the ‘Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry'.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Sci/tech Topic

SPOTLIGHT

The importance of methane seeps in microbial biodiversity of sea floor

University of Delaware

A new study “provides evidence that methane seeps are island-like habitats that harbor distinct microbial communities unique from other seafloor ecosystems." These seeps play an important role in microbial biodiversity of the sea floor.

Methane seeps are natural gas leaks in the sea floor that emit methane into the water. Microorganisms that live on or near these seeps can use the methane as a food source, preventing the gas from collecting in the surrounding hydrosphere or migrating into the atmosphere.

“Marine environments are a potentially huge source for methane outputs to the atmosphere, but the surrounding microbes keep things in check by eating 75 percent of the methane before it gets to the atmosphere. These organisms are an important part of the underwater ecosystem, particularly as it relates to global gas cycles that are climate important in terms of greenhouse gas emissions,” said University of Delaware assistant professor of marine biosciences, Jennifer Biddle.

What's new on our Community Blog



Making Your Own Organic Compost

March 27th, 2015
Need tips for having an organic compost? Click to read more!
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Every Drop Counts

March 16th, 2015
Did you know that a dripping faucet left unfixed for one year can waste up to 393 litres of water? Click to find out about water footprint per capita and many more interesting facts about water usage.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Your Guide to Choosing The Best Eco-Friendly House For Your Family

February 25th, 2015
Studies show that people are becoming more aware of having an eco-friendly home. Need some help? Read on for tips to help you choose the best eco-friendly house for your family.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2015©. Copyright Environmental News Network