From: Kriss Bergethon, Global Warming is Real, More from this Affiliate
Published September 2, 2011 01:26 PM

Falling Solar Panel Costs Are Great For Buyers, Bad for Producers

A recent industry analysis projects the amount of solar power installed to grow to 15.5 percent per year, but revenues are to stay flat until 2016. Lux Research provided the report. A report from Navigant Consulting discovered that the price of solar panels is down almost 20 percent as of August 2011. The information derived from these two reports show that the consumer is poised to benefit from the price reduction while manufacturers can expect an almost flat profit margin for the next few years.

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Manufacturers of solar panels are in a constant price competition. This literally boils down to shaving price per watt by pennies in order to beat out competitors. The reports mean shrinking profit margins with concerns over demand for panels staying strong. Manufacturing capacity for solar hardware is increasing, but the unknown factor is if there will be enough buyers to consume the increased output.

Consumers stand to benefit from the softening in prices as it translates into more solar capacity for the same amount. The lower prices give rise to the idea that solar leasing, an alternative to purchasing panels outright, may gain more traction. However, lower prices go beyond that. A solar industry analyst feels there is an ultimate benefit in the falling prices. It makes solar power leasing viable in states that have been written off in the past.Solar power leasing is designed to provide an alternative to purchasing a solar panel array upfront. Instead of buying the solar panels, consumers pay a monthly fee that reduces their electric bill. In a lease situation, a predetermined fee is set for 20 years. The consumer can also participate in a power purchase arrangement; the consumer buys power from the solar panels. A purchase arrangement is cheaper than buying from traditional grid suppliers.

A consumer can expect to pay $30,000 for the purchase and installation of a complete rooftop solar power array. A 30 percent federal tax rebate and possible state incentives serve to lower the cost. The solar panels make up less than half of the total price, with the rest of the cost going towards labor and necessary hardware. Consumers are going to see little, if any, benefit in the price competition from producers. The price change is going to be seen mainly by installers and solar power lease companies.

Article continues: http://globalwarmingisreal.com/2011/09/01/falling-solar-panel-costs-are-great-for-buyers-bad-for-producers/

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