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Our Editorial and News Affiliates

Care2

Care2 is a trusted social action network that empowers millions of people to lead a healthy, sustainable lifestyle and support socially responsible causes.

Care2's content offering includes original stories, blogs and syndication partners covering a wide range of healthy lifestyle areas, and causes ranging from politics to human rights and animal welfare. By integrating relevant content with action opportunities such as petitions, pledges and daily actions, Care2 builds a deeper level of passion and engagement with its users.

Care2 is the largest and fastest growing social action network, with over 16 million members and 175% growth in unique visitors year over year. Care2 also owns and operates the #1 site for petitions, www.thepetitionsite.com, generating 24 million signatures in the past 12 months. With applications on Facebook and a network of over 100 revenue sharing partner sites, Care2's reach is to over 150 million people.


Website: http://www.care2.com/


Contact:

Redwood City, CA,


¿Realmente necesitamos matar animales salvajes que atacan o amenazan al ser humano?
August 25, 2014 09:17 AM - Lizabeth Paulat, Care2, Care2

En Italia, un hombre que recogía setas fue atacado cuando se encontró con una osa y sus cachorros. Como parte de un programa de reintroducción y conservación en Dolomitas del norte de Italia, la osa, llamada Daniza, recibió la orden de ser capturada y posiblemente ejecutada. Esto ha provocado indignación en medios sociales, generando los twitter para hashtag #iostocondanzia (Estoy con Danzia). La indignación se deriva de la revelación de que cuando la víctima, Daniele Maturi, detectó a la osa...

How did sea life end up living in outer space?
August 25, 2014 07:50 AM - Care2 Causes Editor Viola Knowles, Care2

Russian astronauts, or cosmonauts, have discovered living organisms clinging to the exterior of their International Space Station. The microscopic creatures were discovered during a space walk to clean the surface of the vessel, and they’ve reportedly been identified as a type of sea plankton. But scientists have no idea how they got there.

Do we really need to kill wild animals that attack or threaten humans?
August 24, 2014 07:15 AM - Lizabeth Paulat, Care2

In Italy, a man foraging for mushrooms was attacked when he happened upon a mother bear and her cubs. Part of a reintroduction and conservation program in Italy's northern Dolomites, the bear, named Daniza, was ordered to be captured and possibly killed. This has sparked social media outrage, prompting those on twitter to hashtag #iostocondanzia (I'm with Danzia). The outrage stems from a revelation that when mauling victim Daniele Maturi happened upon the bear, he did not immediately leave, but rather hid behind a tree to watch him. It is said the bear only charged when it spotted him watching from behind a tree (like a predator would do, thus provoking the bear).

University of Illinois studying bee venom as cancer treatment
August 21, 2014 07:33 AM - Anna Brones, Care2

Another reason to love bees: they might be able to help us fight cancer. While venom isn't usually known as a friendly thing, new research shows that venom from bees, snakes and scorpions could potentially be used to fight certain forms of cancer. While you wouldn't go and inject someone with a dose of venom, which could have lethal effects, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that if they isolated specific proteins in the venom, these could be used in a safe way to block tumor growth.

Toxic Algae Scare Prompts Backlash Against Farms
August 18, 2014 09:25 AM - S.E. Smith, Care2

What do a no-drink order in Toledo and a backlash against factory farming have in common? A lot, as it turns out. Residents of Ohio's fourth-largest city were advised for multiple days earlier this month to refrain from drinking their tap water because it had been contaminated by toxic algae. As residents struggled to deal with their contaminated water supply, the culprit behind the problem became readily apparent: factory farms. The Ohio Agriculture Advisory Council (OAAC) is proposing a regulatory crackdown that could forever change industrial farming practices in this Midwestern state.

What can we learn from the California Rim Fire?
August 14, 2014 06:42 AM - Crystal Shepeard, Care2

August 17, 2014 will mark the one year anniversary of the Rim Fire in the California Sierra Nevadas. It was dubbed the Rim Fire due to its proximity to the Rim of the World scenic lookout. The third largest wildfire in California’s history, it burned 257,000 acres of land in Stanislaus National Forest and the western edge of Yosemite National Park, in addition to private land in neighboring counties. It cost more than $127 million to contain, and included more than $50 million in property damage. In the early hours of the fire, a deer hunter was rescued. After the hunter was taken to safety by helicopter, investigators interviewed him to see if he witnessed anything. He told them that he had slipped and caused a rock slide that may have ignited the dry vegetation. As time went on, his story changed several times, even blaming it on marijuana growers. Finally, as the fire had been raging for several weeks, he finally told the real story.

duh DUN... It's Shark Week!
August 13, 2014 12:11 PM - S.E. Smith, Care2

It's time for the 27th annual Shark Week on the Discovery Channel, featuring a solid week of shark-centric programming for viewers who just can't get enough of ... factually incorrect fear-mongering stories about sharks. Sharks are the villain everyone loves to hate, from Jaws to endless B-movies on the SyFy Channel, but in fact, the real enemy is humans. Worldwide, sharks are in critical danger, and we're the only ones who can save them. It's time to put down the remote and take up the cause of shark conservation, because it won't be too long before Shark Week is little more than a series of antique horror films about a superorder of fish that used to be abundant in the world's oceans.

Bees Don't Always Listen to the Hive
August 8, 2014 02:59 PM - Anna Brones, Care2

Honey bees are known for their fascinating social structure. A honey bee colony is in fact a well-organized machine, running on good communication, defense and division of labor. As social insects, honey bees have also been shown the communicate to their fellow foragers, a dance to tell their counterparts where food is located. But listening to other bees isn’t always the name of the game. Sometimes the honeybee just wants to do its own thing.

New Zoo Concept Boasts No Cages
August 6, 2014 08:44 AM - Alicia Graef, Care2

Danish architects are taking on the task of creating a zoo environment that will change what the face of captivity looks like in the future with the reveal of plans for what it's calling the "world's most advanced zoo." The Givskud Zoo in Denmark has accepted a design from the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) that has no cages and will allow animals to live in environments that mimic their natural habitats. The first phase is expected to be completed by 2019, just in time for the park’s 50th anniversary.

Por qué las focas podrían amar que haya más granjas eólicas
July 28, 2014 08:15 AM - Steve Williams, Care2, Care2

Una nueva investigación revela que las granjas eólicas marinas son particularmente útiles para las focas, ya que parece que actúan como arrecifes artificiales, atrayendo a grandes grupos de peces. El estudio realizado por investigadores de la Universidad de St. Andrews en Escocia fue publicado este mes en la revista Current Biology. Los científicos de la investigación dieron seguimiento a un grupo de focas en el mar del Norte con el uso de dispositivos GPS. El propósito del estudio fue...

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