editorial_affiliates

Our Editorial and News Affiliates

Worldwatch Institute

The Worldwatch Institute offers a unique blend of interdisciplinary research, global focus, and accessible writing that has made it a leading source of information on the interactions among key environmental, social, and economic trends. Our work revolves around the transition to an environmentally sustainable and socially just society—and how to achieve it.


Website: http://www.worldwatch.org/


Contact:

Worldwatch Institute
1776 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036-1904
U.S.A.

Phone: 1.202.452.1999
Fax: 1.202.296.7365
worldwatch [AT] worldwatch [DOT] org


U.S. Emissions Reductions May Be Cheaper Than Thought
December 7, 2007 08:28 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

For years, the United States has resisted mandatory reductions in greenhouse gas emissions because of the perceived cost to the national economy. But a new report suggests that significantly reducing U.S. carbon emissions could cost far less than the trillions of dollars some have projected. McKinsey & Co., a privately owned management consulting firm, predicts that making substantial emissions cuts may cost the economy only a few billion dollars, and that at least 40 percent of the reductions would actually bring economic savings.

Polluting Pulp Mill Draws Protest and Spurs World Court Case
December 6, 2007 09:17 AM - , Worldwatch Institute

Environmentalists from Argentina are continuing their more than two-year protest of an Uruguayan pulp mill along a river that separates the two countries. Protesters say the cellulose processing plant, which went into operation on November 9, will release pollutants into the Uruguay River and threaten local ecosystems and human health. Argentine authorities claim that the mill violates a bilateral treaty and have taken the issue to the International Court of Justice in The Hague, The Netherlands.

Chicago’s Alleys Turning Green
December 3, 2007 09:09 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

A new initiative will help make Chicago’s 1,900 miles (3,000 kilometers) of alleyways more sustainable. The miniature streets behind homes and buildings, used mainly for garbage collection and parking access, keep main roads cleaner and less congested but are prone to flooding. The city’s innovative Green Alley Program promotes improved construction techniques and materials that can improve drainage, reduce runoff, and relieve strain on the city’s aging sewer system.

Does the Electricity You Use Demolish Mountains?
November 30, 2007 09:13 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

A new Web-based tool allows U.S. residents to learn how their local electricity consumption may be linked to the destruction of landscapes in the Appalachia region of the eastern United States. With “My Connection,” a feature from North Carolina-based Appalachian Voices, users can enter their ZIP codes and use Google Earth to view the decimated mountains from which their power provider obtains coal. “When you can show people they have a direct connection to it, it makes it that much more relevant to their day-to-day life,” Mary Anne Hitt, the executive director of Appalachian Voices, told the Wall Street Journal.

Coal Use Rises Dramatically Despite Impacts on Climate and Health
November 29, 2007 08:48 AM - , Worldwatch Institute

In 2006, coal accounted for 25 percent of world primary energy supply. Due to its high carbon content, coal was responsible for approximately 40 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels, despite supplying only 32 percent of fossil fuel energy. Management of this plentiful but heavily polluting energy resource has tremendous implications for human welfare, the health of ecosystems, and the stability of the global climate.

World coal consumption reached a record 3,090 million tons of oil equivalent (Mtoe) in 2006, an increase of 4.5 percent over 2005. China led world coal use with 39 percent of the total. The United States followed with 18 percent. The European Union and India accounted for 10 percent and 8 percent, respectively.

U.S. Increasingly Isolated in Stance Against Kyoto
November 28, 2007 09:01 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

Just a day after being elected to office, incoming Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd met with government officials on Sunday to discuss ratifying the Kyoto Protocol, the international pact to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Rudd’s promise to commit his country to the treaty leaves the United States as the only industrialized nation not to ratify the decade-old agreement. Rudd has also accepted an invitation to attend the upcoming United Nations climate conference in Bali, Indonesia, which is expected to be a landmark global meeting on the issue.

New African Reserve Protects Bonobos, Stores Carbon
November 27, 2007 08:31 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

Conservation groups and the government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) have announced the establishment of a new reserve to protect the endangered bonobo, a great ape found only in the DRC’s vast tropical forests. “This is a monumental step towards saving a significant portion of the world’s second largest rainforest, of critical importance to the survival not only of humankind’s closest great ape relative, the bonobo, but to all life on Earth given the increasing threat of climate change,” said Sally Jewell Coxe, president of the Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI), a partner in creating the new reserve.

“Smooth Sailing” in Shipping Creates Environmental, Health, and Security Risks
November 24, 2007 09:44 AM - , Worldwatch Institute

The 58,000-gallon (220,000-liter) oil spill in the San Francisco Bay early this month brought renewed attention to the environmental and health risks of marine shipping. Yet the disaster failed to highlight the lesser-known dangers that shipping creates daily, even when the industry operates as intended. A new report estimates that emissions from ocean-going vessels could be responsible for tens of thousands of deaths each year, and the shipping industry generates serious invasive species and security risks, according to experts.

Clean Energy's Best-Kept Secret: Waste Heat Recovery
November 19, 2007 08:18 AM - Alana Herro, Worldwatch Institute

Recycling the heat that spews from industrial smokestacks may be one of the biggest opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, yet not many climate-savvy entrepreneurs are aware of it. When it comes to energy conservation, "[b]y and large, the world ignores the biggest, single most cost-effective, most profitable thing to do, which is recycle the energy that we’re wasting,"says Thomas Casten, chairman of the Illinois-based company Recycled Energy Development (RED).

Coal Creates Legacy for China’s Past, Future
November 16, 2007 08:26 AM - Julia Tier, Worldwatch Institute

Acid rain and air pollution, mainly from the burning of coal, have contributed to the degradation of more than 80 percent of China’s 33 designated World Heritage sites, according to the Associated Press. Across the nation, particulates from smokestacks have stained historic structures and statues black, including the 17-meter Leshan Giant Buddha, a sandstone landmark that has stood in Sichuan Province since the 7th century.

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