editorial_affiliates

Our Editorial and News Affiliates

Ecologist

The world's leading environmental affairs magazine, now theecologist.org, was founded in 1970 by Edward Goldsmith. The magazine quickly became a platform for those who would go on to be the leading lights of the environmental movement.


Website: http://www.theecologist.org/


Contact:

Tel: +44(0)20 7422 8100

Address:
102 D Lana House Studios
116 - 118 Commercial Street
Spitalfields
London
E1 6NF
United Kingdom



Solar power straight off the shelf
October 2, 2013 08:03 AM - David Thomas, Ecologist

Furniture giant IKEA are soon to stock solar panels in all their UK stores, evidence that renewable technology can really compete in the global marketplace says David Thomas. The mood among UK trade organizations is that despite working hard to promote solar PV as an investment, governmental mismanagement has done the industry harm.

Fracking poses risk to UK farm animals and food safety, experts warn
September 18, 2013 01:02 PM - Andrew Wasley, Ecologist

US researchers behind a study that showed links between gas drilling and sickness in livestock say a moratorium should be imposed on fracking in the UK until its impact on food safety can be assessed. Andrew Wasley reports

Why eating insects is good for the environment
August 29, 2013 09:50 AM - Ben Whitford, Ecologist

As a growing number of chefs put bugs on the menu, Ben Whitford samples his first 'entomophagic' meal and talks to the edible-insect entrepreneurs hoping to convert the rest of us to the environmental and nutritional benefits of eating insects.... The other day, at a busy restaurant in the middle of Washington, D.C, I had bugs for lunch. Sitting at a polished table in Oyamel - a high-end Mexican eatery a stone's throw from the Capitol - I was presented with the house specialty: a fresh corn tortilla cradling a fist-sized heap of glistening chapulines, the roasted grasshoppers prized as a delicacy in the Oaxaca region of Mexico. Reader, I ate them. The carapaces were disconcertingly crunchy, but the taste was subtle - mostly chipotle chilli and lime, with a pleasant nuttiness from the grasshoppers themselves. Later, after picking the legs from my teeth, I chatted with Oyamel head chef Colin King, who sells two or three dozen tacos de chapulines a day to curious diners. Many guests first try them on a dare, King said, only to order second and third helpings. "People generally end up liking the flavour," he adds. Grasshopper tacos won't replace crab cakes and steaks as D.C. power-lunch staples, but the dish's popularity points to the gradual mainstreaming of entomophagy, the practice of eating bugs.

The Hidden Conservation Costs of Renewable Energy
March 27, 2013 01:55 PM - Luke Dale-Harris, Ecologist

Ecologist writer Luke Dale-Harris questions the ability of Natura 2000 to work as an effective environmental regulator. The birds that migrate freely across Europe are unaware of the invisible borders that lie below them. They follow the same routes that have carried them to warmth every year for an eternity, marked out by the indomitable features of the landscape - the coast of the Atlantic on one side and the curve of the Carpathian Mountains on the other. But it is what they miss that matters most; their future, along with that of the rest of us, is dictated by the political and economic tides that shift shape across the continent.

Earth Hour 2013: March 23, 8:30 PM
March 11, 2013 09:51 AM - Editor, Ecologist

WWF's Earth Hour is a unique annual phenomenon that focuses the world's attention on our amazing planet, and how we need to protect it. Earth Hour is a simple idea gone global. Show your support and switch off! WWF is calling for people across the world to take part in Earth Hour 2013 — the biggest switch-off in history. At 8:30pm on 23rd March hundreds of millions of people across the globe are expected to turn off their lights for an hour, to show they care about the future of our planet. Last year's Earth Hour saw a staggering 6,950 towns and cities in more than 152 countries take part in what has become a global movement. From a single domestic light bulb to giant iconic illuminations such as Big Ben, the Taj Mahal and the Sydney Opera House, the Earth Hour switch-off can demonstrate a determination to help protect the planet.

Feeding Paris - why the city needs to adopt the 'fairer' diet
December 7, 2012 08:40 AM - Carolyn Lebel, Ecologist

Like all great cities, Paris has the power to draw in food and resources from all corners of the Earth. And with every meal, this food-lovers' paradise unwittingly sketches the fate of its countryside and seashores, near and far.

Ocean-grabbing threatens the food security of entire communities
November 15, 2012 08:43 AM - Olivier De Schutter, Ecologist

All over the world, food systems and the ecosystems they rely on are coming under pressure from the over-exploitation of natural resources. But nowhere are these impacts occurring as rapidly and dramatically as in the world's oceans.

Ash dieback: number of affected counties doubles
November 13, 2012 10:29 AM - Adam Vaughan and John Vidal, Ecologist

As tree growers and plant health experts from 80 organisations met at a summit convened by the environment secretary, Owen Paterson, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said ash dieback had now been confirmed in the wild in six new counties: Berkshire, Bedfordshire, Lincolnshire, Northumberland, Sussex and Yorkshire. A total of 115 sites in 11 counties, including some in Wales and Scotland, are now confirmed.

Toxic chemicals used for leather production poisoning India’s tannery workers
October 29, 2012 08:16 AM - Pter Bengsten,Danwatch, Ecologist

India’s tanning industry has started tackling environmental issues but its progress on worker safety is woeful. As Peter Bengtsen found out, illness and deaths linked to toxic tanning chemicals appear worryingly common. The day began as every other day for 32-year-old tannery worker, Ramu. He woke at five in the morning next to his wife, Tamil Arasi, and four children in the family’s one-room hut in a tiny rural village in southern India. After his usual breakfast of rice and lentils, he left to clean waste tanks at some of the hundreds of tanneries in Vaniyambadi. He never returned home.

Cleaning up the Bosphorus
October 22, 2012 08:27 AM - Alina Lehtinen, Ecologist

The Bosphorus - which divides Istanbul into the European and Asian side - is one of the most active and most polluted rivers in the world. Resident Alina Lehtinen discovers it's not the garbage but sewerage that is the key pollutant in the city's ailing waterways.

First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next | Last