From: Anneli Waara, ScienceDaily, originally in Uppsala Universitet, via AlphaGalileo
Published February 26, 2012 07:29 AM

European Neanderthals and Modern Humans

New findings from an international team of researchers show that most Neanderthals in Europe died off around 50,000 years ago. The previously held view of a Europe populated by a stable Neanderthal population for hundreds of thousands of years up until modern humans arrived must therefore be revised.

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This new perspective on the Neanderthals comes from a study of ancient DNA published February 25 in Molecular Biology and Evolution.
The results indicate that most Neanderthals in Europe died off as early as 50,000 years ago.After that, a small group of Neanderthals recolonised central and western Europe, where they survived for another 10,000 years before modern humans entered the picture.

The study is the result of an international project led by Swedish and Spanish researchers in Uppsala, Stockholm and Madrid.
"The fact that Neanderthals in Europe were nearly extinct, but then recovered, and that all this took place long before they came into contact with modern humans came as a complete surprise to us. This indicates that the Neanderthals may have been more sensitive to the dramatic climate changes that took place in the last Ice Age than was previously thought", says Love Dalén, associate professor at the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm.

Photo credit: http://www.neanderthalproject.com

Article continues: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120225110942.htm

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