From: Florida Atlantic University
Published February 23, 2017 09:53 AM

Cavefish May Help Humans Evolve to Require Very Little Sleep

We all do it; we all need it – humans and animals alike. Sleep is an essential behavior shared by nearly all animals and disruption of this process is associated with an array of physiological and behavioral deficits. Although there are so many factors contributing to sleep loss, very little is known about the neural basis for interactions between sleep and sensory processing. 

Neuroscientists at Florida Atlantic University have been studying Mexican cavefish to provide insight into the evolutionary mechanisms regulating sleep loss and the relationship between sensory processing and sleep. They are investigating how sleep evolves and using this species as a model to understand how human brains could evolve to require very little sleep, just like the cavefish.

In their latest study, just published in the Journal of Experimental Biology , findings suggest that an inability to block out your environment is one of the ways to lose sleep. The study also provides a model for understanding how the brain’s sensory systems modulate sleep and sheds light into the evolution of the significant differences in sleep duration observed throughout the animal kingdom.

Read more at Florida Atlantic University

Photo credit: Florida Atlantic University

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