From: University of Warwick
Published September 12, 2017 01:36 PM

Historic Legacies Affect Climate Change Survival In Caribbean

The legacies of empire have increased the vulnerability of Caribbean states to climate change, according to University of Warwick expert Dr Leon Sealey-Huggins.

  • Caribbean societies are among the least responsible for causing climate change but are among the most exposed to its negative effects
  • Global inequalities arising from historic factors mean Caribbean societies have limited resources to deal with the challenges of climate change
  • Unequal power relationships limit Caribbean countries’ ability to set the climate change agenda
  • Historical inequalities must be addressed in order to move forward on climate change in a just and lasting way

In a new paper published this week, Dr Sealey-Huggins finds that discussion of climate change has failed to pay enough attention to the social, political and historic factors which increase the vulnerability of Caribbean societies, and calls for a new approach focused on understanding and addressing these historic inequalities.

Read more at University of Warwick

Image: The legacies of empire have increased the vulnerability of Caribbean states to climate change, according to University of Warwick expert Dr Leon Sealey-Huggins. (Credit: University of Warwick)

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