Spotlights

Small farmers cause substantial damage in the Amazon rainforest
June 25, 2012 03:52 PM - Rhett Butler

Small farmers are less likely than large landowners to maintain required forest cover on their property in the Brazilian Amazon, worsening the environmental impact of their operations, reported a researcher presenting at the annual meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) in Bonito, Brazil. Fernanda Michalski, an ecologist with the University of São Paulo and the Pro-Carnivores Institute, analyzed forest cover trends on properties of various sizes in Alta Floresta in the southern Amazon and conducted interviews with farmers on the presence of wildlife on their holdings. She found that small properties (under 440 ha) tend to have less forest cover. Riparian zones are less likely to be maintained, reducing the connectivity of what forest patches do survive, making it more difficult for wildlife to move. Smaller forest blocks were affected by edge effects, leaving them without the cool, dark, stable conditions of the forest interior that some species require. Accordingly large-bodied mammals, birds, and reptiles are scarce on smallholder properties.

Small farmers cause substantial damage in the Amazon rainforest
June 25, 2012 03:52 PM - Rhett Butler

Small farmers are less likely than large landowners to maintain required forest cover on their property in the Brazilian Amazon, worsening the environmental impact of their operations, reported a researcher presenting at the annual meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) in Bonito, Brazil. Fernanda Michalski, an ecologist with the University of São Paulo and the Pro-Carnivores Institute, analyzed forest cover trends on properties of various sizes in Alta Floresta in the southern Amazon and conducted interviews with farmers on the presence of wildlife on their holdings. She found that small properties (under 440 ha) tend to have less forest cover. Riparian zones are less likely to be maintained, reducing the connectivity of what forest patches do survive, making it more difficult for wildlife to move. Smaller forest blocks were affected by edge effects, leaving them without the cool, dark, stable conditions of the forest interior that some species require. Accordingly large-bodied mammals, birds, and reptiles are scarce on smallholder properties.

Small farmers cause substantial damage in the Amazon rainforest
June 25, 2012 03:52 PM - Rhett Butler

Small farmers are less likely than large landowners to maintain required forest cover on their property in the Brazilian Amazon, worsening the environmental impact of their operations, reported a researcher presenting at the annual meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) in Bonito, Brazil. Fernanda Michalski, an ecologist with the University of São Paulo and the Pro-Carnivores Institute, analyzed forest cover trends on properties of various sizes in Alta Floresta in the southern Amazon and conducted interviews with farmers on the presence of wildlife on their holdings. She found that small properties (under 440 ha) tend to have less forest cover. Riparian zones are less likely to be maintained, reducing the connectivity of what forest patches do survive, making it more difficult for wildlife to move. Smaller forest blocks were affected by edge effects, leaving them without the cool, dark, stable conditions of the forest interior that some species require. Accordingly large-bodied mammals, birds, and reptiles are scarce on smallholder properties.

Small farmers cause substantial damage in the Amazon rainforest
June 25, 2012 03:52 PM - Rhett Butler

Small farmers are less likely than large landowners to maintain required forest cover on their property in the Brazilian Amazon, worsening the environmental impact of their operations, reported a researcher presenting at the annual meeting of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation (ATBC) in Bonito, Brazil. Fernanda Michalski, an ecologist with the University of São Paulo and the Pro-Carnivores Institute, analyzed forest cover trends on properties of various sizes in Alta Floresta in the southern Amazon and conducted interviews with farmers on the presence of wildlife on their holdings. She found that small properties (under 440 ha) tend to have less forest cover. Riparian zones are less likely to be maintained, reducing the connectivity of what forest patches do survive, making it more difficult for wildlife to move. Smaller forest blocks were affected by edge effects, leaving them without the cool, dark, stable conditions of the forest interior that some species require. Accordingly large-bodied mammals, birds, and reptiles are scarce on smallholder properties.

5 Most At-Risk Rivers in the World
June 12, 2012 04:18 PM - Aniya Wells, ENN Guest Contributor

It is often said that life began on a river bed. It's no surprise that, still today, the world's rivers make up some of the most fundamental sources of fresh water and habitats for life of all kinds. Unfortunately, some of the largest and most highly-needed rivers are under attack from environmental threats that have already caused potentially fatal disruption. That's why the WWF, World Wide Fund for Nature, compiled a list of some of the most threatened rivers in the world. Based on the results of international assessments, the WWF based their list on six of the most significant threats to rivers: dams and infrastructure, excessive water extraction, climate change, invasive species, over-fishing, and pollution. They singled out rivers that are either already suffering the most as a result of any or all of these threats or are in line to be heavily impacted: 1. Salween — Nu The Salween river basin is the second largest in Southeast Asia and runs, starting along the Southwest edge of China, from the northern edge of India, past Myanmar, Laos, and Thailand, eventually spilling into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. According to the WWF, 6 million people depend on the Salween to make a living and find sources of protein and nutrient rich food...

5 Most At-Risk Rivers in the World
June 12, 2012 04:18 PM - Aniya Wells, ENN Guest Contributor

It is often said that life began on a river bed. It's no surprise that, still today, the world's rivers make up some of the most fundamental sources of fresh water and habitats for life of all kinds. Unfortunately, some of the largest and most highly-needed rivers are under attack from environmental threats that have already caused potentially fatal disruption. That's why the WWF, World Wide Fund for Nature, compiled a list of some of the most threatened rivers in the world. Based on the results of international assessments, the WWF based their list on six of the most significant threats to rivers: dams and infrastructure, excessive water extraction, climate change, invasive species, over-fishing, and pollution. They singled out rivers that are either already suffering the most as a result of any or all of these threats or are in line to be heavily impacted: 1. Salween — Nu The Salween river basin is the second largest in Southeast Asia and runs, starting along the Southwest edge of China, from the northern edge of India, past Myanmar, Laos, and Thailand, eventually spilling into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. According to the WWF, 6 million people depend on the Salween to make a living and find sources of protein and nutrient rich food...

5 Most At-Risk Rivers in the World
June 12, 2012 04:18 PM - Aniya Wells, ENN Guest Contributor

It is often said that life began on a river bed. It's no surprise that, still today, the world's rivers make up some of the most fundamental sources of fresh water and habitats for life of all kinds. Unfortunately, some of the largest and most highly-needed rivers are under attack from environmental threats that have already caused potentially fatal disruption. That's why the WWF, World Wide Fund for Nature, compiled a list of some of the most threatened rivers in the world. Based on the results of international assessments, the WWF based their list on six of the most significant threats to rivers: dams and infrastructure, excessive water extraction, climate change, invasive species, over-fishing, and pollution. They singled out rivers that are either already suffering the most as a result of any or all of these threats or are in line to be heavily impacted: 1. Salween — Nu The Salween river basin is the second largest in Southeast Asia and runs, starting along the Southwest edge of China, from the northern edge of India, past Myanmar, Laos, and Thailand, eventually spilling into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. According to the WWF, 6 million people depend on the Salween to make a living and find sources of protein and nutrient rich food...

5 Most At-Risk Rivers in the World
June 12, 2012 04:18 PM - Aniya Wells, ENN Guest Contributor

It is often said that life began on a river bed. It's no surprise that, still today, the world's rivers make up some of the most fundamental sources of fresh water and habitats for life of all kinds. Unfortunately, some of the largest and most highly-needed rivers are under attack from environmental threats that have already caused potentially fatal disruption. That's why the WWF, World Wide Fund for Nature, compiled a list of some of the most threatened rivers in the world. Based on the results of international assessments, the WWF based their list on six of the most significant threats to rivers: dams and infrastructure, excessive water extraction, climate change, invasive species, over-fishing, and pollution. They singled out rivers that are either already suffering the most as a result of any or all of these threats or are in line to be heavily impacted: 1. Salween — Nu The Salween river basin is the second largest in Southeast Asia and runs, starting along the Southwest edge of China, from the northern edge of India, past Myanmar, Laos, and Thailand, eventually spilling into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. According to the WWF, 6 million people depend on the Salween to make a living and find sources of protein and nutrient rich food...

5 Most At-Risk Rivers in the World
June 12, 2012 04:18 PM - Aniya Wells, ENN Guest Contributor

It is often said that life began on a river bed. It's no surprise that, still today, the world's rivers make up some of the most fundamental sources of fresh water and habitats for life of all kinds. Unfortunately, some of the largest and most highly-needed rivers are under attack from environmental threats that have already caused potentially fatal disruption. That's why the WWF, World Wide Fund for Nature, compiled a list of some of the most threatened rivers in the world. Based on the results of international assessments, the WWF based their list on six of the most significant threats to rivers: dams and infrastructure, excessive water extraction, climate change, invasive species, over-fishing, and pollution. They singled out rivers that are either already suffering the most as a result of any or all of these threats or are in line to be heavily impacted: 1. Salween — Nu The Salween river basin is the second largest in Southeast Asia and runs, starting along the Southwest edge of China, from the northern edge of India, past Myanmar, Laos, and Thailand, eventually spilling into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. According to the WWF, 6 million people depend on the Salween to make a living and find sources of protein and nutrient rich food...

5 Most At-Risk Rivers in the World
June 12, 2012 04:18 PM - Aniya Wells, ENN Guest Contributor

It is often said that life began on a river bed. It's no surprise that, still today, the world's rivers make up some of the most fundamental sources of fresh water and habitats for life of all kinds. Unfortunately, some of the largest and most highly-needed rivers are under attack from environmental threats that have already caused potentially fatal disruption. That's why the WWF, World Wide Fund for Nature, compiled a list of some of the most threatened rivers in the world. Based on the results of international assessments, the WWF based their list on six of the most significant threats to rivers: dams and infrastructure, excessive water extraction, climate change, invasive species, over-fishing, and pollution. They singled out rivers that are either already suffering the most as a result of any or all of these threats or are in line to be heavily impacted: 1. Salween — Nu The Salween river basin is the second largest in Southeast Asia and runs, starting along the Southwest edge of China, from the northern edge of India, past Myanmar, Laos, and Thailand, eventually spilling into the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean. According to the WWF, 6 million people depend on the Salween to make a living and find sources of protein and nutrient rich food...

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