Spotlights

The strangest creatures on Earth
August 26, 2011 10:41 AM - BBC Earth

When Steve Backshall and his Deadly team began their expedition to find 60 of the world's deadliest animals, little did they know that it wouldn't just be the dangerous animals that would send a shiver up their spines! When the Deadly team travelled to Madagascar they discovered that it was definitely home to the weird and wonderful. It’s not only Madagascar that boasts the bizarre. During Deadly 60 Steve has encountered his fair share of freaky creatures around the world, here’s a few of his favourites. 1. Wolf eel - British Columbia: The strange monstrous looking wolf-eel, with its football sized head, spiky chisel like front teeth and crunching molars means it can devour sea urchins with ease. 2. Solifuge - Mozambique: Described by Steve as the creepiest creature he’s ever seen, it’s also the fastest invertebrate on the planet with the biggest jaws relative to body size of any animal on earth. Legend has it that they chase after people and eat them alive. 3. Wrinkle lipped bats - Borneo: with its peculiar thick wrinkly lips, heavy jowls and horny big ears it certainly looks odd.

The strangest creatures on Earth
August 26, 2011 10:41 AM - BBC Earth

When Steve Backshall and his Deadly team began their expedition to find 60 of the world's deadliest animals, little did they know that it wouldn't just be the dangerous animals that would send a shiver up their spines! When the Deadly team travelled to Madagascar they discovered that it was definitely home to the weird and wonderful. It’s not only Madagascar that boasts the bizarre. During Deadly 60 Steve has encountered his fair share of freaky creatures around the world, here’s a few of his favourites. 1. Wolf eel - British Columbia: The strange monstrous looking wolf-eel, with its football sized head, spiky chisel like front teeth and crunching molars means it can devour sea urchins with ease. 2. Solifuge - Mozambique: Described by Steve as the creepiest creature he’s ever seen, it’s also the fastest invertebrate on the planet with the biggest jaws relative to body size of any animal on earth. Legend has it that they chase after people and eat them alive. 3. Wrinkle lipped bats - Borneo: with its peculiar thick wrinkly lips, heavy jowls and horny big ears it certainly looks odd.

The strangest creatures on Earth
August 26, 2011 10:41 AM - BBC Earth

When Steve Backshall and his Deadly team began their expedition to find 60 of the world's deadliest animals, little did they know that it wouldn't just be the dangerous animals that would send a shiver up their spines! When the Deadly team travelled to Madagascar they discovered that it was definitely home to the weird and wonderful. It’s not only Madagascar that boasts the bizarre. During Deadly 60 Steve has encountered his fair share of freaky creatures around the world, here’s a few of his favourites. 1. Wolf eel - British Columbia: The strange monstrous looking wolf-eel, with its football sized head, spiky chisel like front teeth and crunching molars means it can devour sea urchins with ease. 2. Solifuge - Mozambique: Described by Steve as the creepiest creature he’s ever seen, it’s also the fastest invertebrate on the planet with the biggest jaws relative to body size of any animal on earth. Legend has it that they chase after people and eat them alive. 3. Wrinkle lipped bats - Borneo: with its peculiar thick wrinkly lips, heavy jowls and horny big ears it certainly looks odd.

The strangest creatures on Earth
August 26, 2011 10:41 AM - BBC Earth

When Steve Backshall and his Deadly team began their expedition to find 60 of the world's deadliest animals, little did they know that it wouldn't just be the dangerous animals that would send a shiver up their spines! When the Deadly team travelled to Madagascar they discovered that it was definitely home to the weird and wonderful. It’s not only Madagascar that boasts the bizarre. During Deadly 60 Steve has encountered his fair share of freaky creatures around the world, here’s a few of his favourites. 1. Wolf eel - British Columbia: The strange monstrous looking wolf-eel, with its football sized head, spiky chisel like front teeth and crunching molars means it can devour sea urchins with ease. 2. Solifuge - Mozambique: Described by Steve as the creepiest creature he’s ever seen, it’s also the fastest invertebrate on the planet with the biggest jaws relative to body size of any animal on earth. Legend has it that they chase after people and eat them alive. 3. Wrinkle lipped bats - Borneo: with its peculiar thick wrinkly lips, heavy jowls and horny big ears it certainly looks odd.

The strangest creatures on Earth
August 26, 2011 10:41 AM - BBC Earth

When Steve Backshall and his Deadly team began their expedition to find 60 of the world's deadliest animals, little did they know that it wouldn't just be the dangerous animals that would send a shiver up their spines! When the Deadly team travelled to Madagascar they discovered that it was definitely home to the weird and wonderful. It’s not only Madagascar that boasts the bizarre. During Deadly 60 Steve has encountered his fair share of freaky creatures around the world, here’s a few of his favourites. 1. Wolf eel - British Columbia: The strange monstrous looking wolf-eel, with its football sized head, spiky chisel like front teeth and crunching molars means it can devour sea urchins with ease. 2. Solifuge - Mozambique: Described by Steve as the creepiest creature he’s ever seen, it’s also the fastest invertebrate on the planet with the biggest jaws relative to body size of any animal on earth. Legend has it that they chase after people and eat them alive. 3. Wrinkle lipped bats - Borneo: with its peculiar thick wrinkly lips, heavy jowls and horny big ears it certainly looks odd.

The most painful sting in the world
August 19, 2011 11:39 AM - BBC Earth

Steve Backshall and the Deadly 60 team trek deep into the hot and muddy jungle to seek out one of the world’s most elusive birds of prey. But no Deadly 60 trip is without its surprises, and when Steve meets an old enemy his nerves truly are put to the test. What's the most painful sting in the insect world? In the jungles of Panama Steve faced his fear and handled a mind blowingly painful stinger — the bullet ant. A sting from most ants is nothing more than a painful nip, often with a bit of formic acid thrown in. But not the bullet ant. As its name suggests, a sting from one of these is like being shot! In 1984, a man named Justin Schmidt published a paper in the journal Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology. He subjected himself to the stings of 78 different insects which resulted in the Schmidt Pain Index with stings rated from 0 (no effect) to a maximum of 4 (most painful). Here are some of his pain ratings and his amusingly vivid descriptions. 1.0 - Sweat Bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. As if a tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.

The most painful sting in the world
August 19, 2011 11:39 AM - BBC Earth

Steve Backshall and the Deadly 60 team trek deep into the hot and muddy jungle to seek out one of the world’s most elusive birds of prey. But no Deadly 60 trip is without its surprises, and when Steve meets an old enemy his nerves truly are put to the test. What's the most painful sting in the insect world? In the jungles of Panama Steve faced his fear and handled a mind blowingly painful stinger — the bullet ant. A sting from most ants is nothing more than a painful nip, often with a bit of formic acid thrown in. But not the bullet ant. As its name suggests, a sting from one of these is like being shot! In 1984, a man named Justin Schmidt published a paper in the journal Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology. He subjected himself to the stings of 78 different insects which resulted in the Schmidt Pain Index with stings rated from 0 (no effect) to a maximum of 4 (most painful). Here are some of his pain ratings and his amusingly vivid descriptions. 1.0 - Sweat Bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. As if a tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.

The most painful sting in the world
August 19, 2011 11:39 AM - BBC Earth

Steve Backshall and the Deadly 60 team trek deep into the hot and muddy jungle to seek out one of the world’s most elusive birds of prey. But no Deadly 60 trip is without its surprises, and when Steve meets an old enemy his nerves truly are put to the test. What's the most painful sting in the insect world? In the jungles of Panama Steve faced his fear and handled a mind blowingly painful stinger — the bullet ant. A sting from most ants is nothing more than a painful nip, often with a bit of formic acid thrown in. But not the bullet ant. As its name suggests, a sting from one of these is like being shot! In 1984, a man named Justin Schmidt published a paper in the journal Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology. He subjected himself to the stings of 78 different insects which resulted in the Schmidt Pain Index with stings rated from 0 (no effect) to a maximum of 4 (most painful). Here are some of his pain ratings and his amusingly vivid descriptions. 1.0 - Sweat Bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. As if a tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.

The most painful sting in the world
August 19, 2011 11:39 AM - BBC Earth

Steve Backshall and the Deadly 60 team trek deep into the hot and muddy jungle to seek out one of the world’s most elusive birds of prey. But no Deadly 60 trip is without its surprises, and when Steve meets an old enemy his nerves truly are put to the test. What's the most painful sting in the insect world? In the jungles of Panama Steve faced his fear and handled a mind blowingly painful stinger — the bullet ant. A sting from most ants is nothing more than a painful nip, often with a bit of formic acid thrown in. But not the bullet ant. As its name suggests, a sting from one of these is like being shot! In 1984, a man named Justin Schmidt published a paper in the journal Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology. He subjected himself to the stings of 78 different insects which resulted in the Schmidt Pain Index with stings rated from 0 (no effect) to a maximum of 4 (most painful). Here are some of his pain ratings and his amusingly vivid descriptions. 1.0 - Sweat Bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. As if a tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.

The most painful sting in the world
August 19, 2011 11:39 AM - BBC Earth

Steve Backshall and the Deadly 60 team trek deep into the hot and muddy jungle to seek out one of the world’s most elusive birds of prey. But no Deadly 60 trip is without its surprises, and when Steve meets an old enemy his nerves truly are put to the test. What's the most painful sting in the insect world? In the jungles of Panama Steve faced his fear and handled a mind blowingly painful stinger — the bullet ant. A sting from most ants is nothing more than a painful nip, often with a bit of formic acid thrown in. But not the bullet ant. As its name suggests, a sting from one of these is like being shot! In 1984, a man named Justin Schmidt published a paper in the journal Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology. He subjected himself to the stings of 78 different insects which resulted in the Schmidt Pain Index with stings rated from 0 (no effect) to a maximum of 4 (most painful). Here are some of his pain ratings and his amusingly vivid descriptions. 1.0 - Sweat Bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. As if a tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.