From: Sarah Nightingale
Published October 21, 2016 11:25 AM

From Ancient Fossils to Future Cars

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering have developed an inexpensive, energy-efficient way to create silicon-based anodes for lithium-ion batteries from the fossilized remains of single-celled algae called diatoms. The research could lead to the development of ultra-high capacity lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles and portable electronics.

Titled “Carbon-Coated, Diatomite-Derived Nanosilicon as a High Rate Capable Li-ion Battery Anode,” a paper describing the research was published recently in the journal Scientific Reports. The research was led by Mihri Ozkan, professor of electrical engineering, and Cengiz Ozkan, professor of mechanical engineering. Brennan Campbell, a graduate student in materials science and engineering, was first author on the paper.

Continue reading at University of California - Riverside

Photo: Electron microscopy showing one of the unique geometries observed in the nano-silicon power derived from diatomaceous earth.

Photo via University of California - Riverside

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