From: Mayo Clinic
Published January 19, 2017 04:06 PM

Mayo researchers identify mechanism of oncogene action in lung cancer

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper published this week in Cancer Cell, Mayo Clinic researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified a genetic promoter of cancer that drives a major form of lung cancer. In a new paper published this week in Cancer Cell, Mayo Clinic researchers provide genetic evidence that Ect2 drives lung adenocarcinoma tumor formation.

“This paper demonstrates, for the first time, that Ect2 is required for tumor formation in vivo and identifies a novel function related to ribosomes for Ect2 in lung adenocarcinoma tumor cells,” says Alan Fields, Ph.D., senior author on the paper.

Dr. Fields is a cancer biologist and the Monica Flynn Jacoby Professor of Cancer Research in the Department of Cancer Biology at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.

KRAS mutation in lung cancer

Lung adenocarcinoma accounts for 40 percent of lung cancer diagnoses according to Dr. Fields. And the most frequent driver of this cancer is a mutation in the KRAS gene.

Read more at Mayo Clinic

Photo credit: Dr. Cecil Fox via Wikimedia Commons

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