From: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
Published March 9, 2017 10:06 AM

Investment key in adapting to climate change in West Africa

Climate projections for West Africa show that crop yields and grass for livestock grazing are likely to decline in the future. But a new study in the journal Global Environmental Change shows that when ineffective institutions and political instability limit investment in agriculture climate change would have greater impacts on regional food security.

West Africa is a major producer of crops such as cassava, millet, and sorghum but in the future, regional production may not be able to meet the growing demand for food and livestock feed. “How and to what extent the region’s agricultural sector develops in the future will have profound implications for the livelihoods of millions of people,” says IIASA researcher Amanda Palazzo, who led the study.

“In some ways, West Africa is at the mercy of changes in the rest of the world—there is not much that people can do to stop global change on a local level. Our study shows that indeed, socioeconomic development and climate change in the rest of the world will affect West Africa. But that doesn’t mean that policymakers are powerless to avoid the impacts,” says Palazzo. “We found that food security in the region could improve even under the threat of climate change if the region takes a coordinated and long-term approach to investment and development.”

Read more at International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Cartoon representations of the four CCAFS West Africa scenarios along the two axes of uncertainty. Source: Drawings by artist Andre Daniel Tapsoba

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2017©. Copyright Environmental News Network