From: University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Published May 16, 2017 12:10 PM

Scientists Study Atmospheric Waves Radiating out of Hurricanes

Researchers believe they have found a new way to monitor the intensity and location of hurricanes from hundreds of miles away by detecting atmospheric waves radiating from the centers of these powerful storms.

In a new study, scientists from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and the Hurricane Research Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) presented direct observations of the waves, obtained by NOAA aircraft flying in hurricanes and by a research buoy located in the Pacific Ocean. The waves, known as atmospheric gravity waves, are produced by strong thunderstorms near the eye and radiate outward in expanding spirals.

“These very subtle waves can sometimes be seen in satellite images,” said David Nolan, professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, and lead author of the study. “We were able to measure them in aircraft data and surface instruments.”

Read more at University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

Image: Typhoon Meranti. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science)

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