From: USGS
Published August 28, 2017 08:33 AM

USGS Installs Storm-tide Sensors along Texas Coast prior to Harvey's Arrival

Storm-tide sensors are being installed at key locations along the Texas Gulf Coast by the U.S. Geological Survey in advance of Hurricane Harvey.

Storm surge, coastal erosion and inland flooding are among the most dangerous natural hazards unleashed by hurricanes, with the capacity to destroy homes and businesses, wipe out roads, bridges, water and sewer systems, and profoundly alter landscapes. The USGS has experts on these hazards, state-of-the-science computer models for forecasting them, and sophisticated equipment for monitoring actual flood and tide conditions.

Five USGS crews are installing around 15 storm-tide sensors today along the coastline within the areas between San Luis Pass and Corpus Christi. The equipment will be installed on bridges, piers and other structures that have a good chance of surviving a storm surge during a hurricane. The equipment is housed in vented or non-vented steel pipes a few inches wide and about a foot long. The information they collect will help define the depth and duration of a storm-surge, as well as the time of its arrival and retreat. That information will help public officials assess storm damage, discern between wind and flood damage, and improve computer models used to forecast future floods.

 

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Photo via USGS.

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