Agriculture

Agricultural practices to reduce runoff
May 23, 2015 07:27 AM - South Dakota State University via ScienceDaily.

The same spring rains that lessen producers' concerns about drought can also lead to soil erosion and nutrient runoff. Keeping soil and fertilizers where they belong -- in the field -- benefits producers and the environment.

No-till farming, cover crops and rotational grazing will help producers reduce surface runoff to improve soil and water quality, according to South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station researcher Sandeep Kumar, an assistant professor in the SDSU plant science department.

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ENN Releases App for Android Users
February 23, 2015 09:14 AM - ENN Editor

Last month ENN launched a new mobile app available at the iTunes store making it easier for you to connect with us and stay up to date with groundbreaking environmental news. Now, ENN releases the mobile app at Google Play, making it compatible for Android users.

ENN is more than just a gatherer of environmental news but rather a unique set of resources, archives, tools, and experts for the increasingly complex field of environmental science attracting readers from all levels of government, business and academia.

We also encourage you to join the conversation by checking out our Community Blog and by connecting with us on Facebook.

Apple users can download the app at the iTunes store.

Android users can download the app at Google Play.

Make sure you click on the app with the logo shown here.

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SPOTLIGHT

Why Dedicating Land to Bioenergy Won't Curb Climate Change

Guest Contributor, Tim Searchinger

This post originally was published on WRI.org.

How does bioenergy contribute to a sustainable food and climate future?

new WRI paper finds bioenergy can play a modest role using wastes and other niche fuelstocks, but recommends against dedicating land to produce bioenergy. The lesson: do not grow food or grass crops for ethanol or diesel or cut down trees for electricity.

Even modest quantities of bioenergy would greatly increase the global competition for land. People already use roughly three-quarters of the world’s vegetated land for crops, livestock grazing and wood harvests. The remaining land protects clean water, supports biodiversity and stores carbon in trees, shrubs and soils -- a benefit increasingly important for tackling climate change. The competition for land is growing, even without more bioenergy, to meet likely demands for at least 70 percent more food, forage and wood.

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Once Lawn’s Ally, Clover Rebranded as Unwelcome Invader

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With winter’s grudging departure, the season when many homeowners quest for the perfect, uniform, green lawn -- their own shimmering Holy Grail – has finally arrived! But what makes for a perfect lawn? What is it about grass that merits such reverence, such tender nurturing, such expense! And what makes a weed, a weed, and thus deserving of the ultimate punishment?
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

The NASA Guide to Air-filtering Houseplants

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With so much time being spent indoors, it's important to ensure clean air. With the addition of some regular houseplants, indoor greenery can help filter harmful toxins and pollutants from the air. Find out what's in our air and some indoor plant suggestions here!
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

8 of the Strangest Allergy Cures

May 13th, 2015
While nothing compares to the beauty of mother nature in full spring bloom, for those of us that suffer from seasonal allergies, we cannot wait for spring to move on. To help combat your allergies this season, check out these 8 strange cures from around the world.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

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