Agriculture

Native leech preys on invasive slug?
July 21, 2017 09:15 AM - Hokkaido University

The giant slug Limax maximus is native to Europe and Asia Minor but has spread widely, being found in North America, South America, North Africa, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and other regions. The slug is recognized as a notorious pest because it eats agricultural and garden crops.

Native leech preys on invasive slug?
July 21, 2017 09:15 AM - Hokkaido University

The giant slug Limax maximus is native to Europe and Asia Minor but has spread widely, being found in North America, South America, North Africa, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and other regions. The slug is recognized as a notorious pest because it eats agricultural and garden crops.

Heritage and ancient grain project feeds a growing demand
July 20, 2017 12:18 PM - Cornell University

After a century of markets dominated by a few types of wheat and white flour, ancient and heritage wheat varieties are making a comeback.

Heritage and ancient grain project feeds a growing demand
July 20, 2017 12:18 PM - Cornell University

After a century of markets dominated by a few types of wheat and white flour, ancient and heritage wheat varieties are making a comeback.

Nesting aids make agricultural fields attractive for bees
July 20, 2017 10:10 AM - University of Würzburg

Farmers are facing a problem: Honeybees are becoming ever more rare in many places. But a lot of plants can only produce fruits and seeds when their flowers were previously pollinated with pollen from different individuals. So when there are no pollinators around, yields will decrease.

Nesting aids make agricultural fields attractive for bees
July 20, 2017 10:10 AM - University of Würzburg

Farmers are facing a problem: Honeybees are becoming ever more rare in many places. But a lot of plants can only produce fruits and seeds when their flowers were previously pollinated with pollen from different individuals. So when there are no pollinators around, yields will decrease.

Looking back to move agriculture forward
July 20, 2017 08:05 AM - University of Ottawa

Small farmers and indigenous communities have practised sustainable agriculture for centuries. Chidi Oguamanam is working to ensure that traditional knowledge is recognized and shared equitably.

The kind of clean technology Chidi Oguamanam advocates looks a lot different from what many of us might imagine. No high-tech solar panels. No futuristic gizmos. No scientists in a lab.

University-led study looks to reduce methane gas emissions in cattle
July 20, 2017 08:05 AM - University of Lethbridge

Seeking to mitigate the greenhouse gas contributions of the region’s agricultural sector, a University of Lethbridge-led study has been granted $1.1 million by the federal government’s Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program.

“Canadian farmers are great stewards of the land and the environment. These new investments are part of the government’s commitment to addressing climate change and ensuring our farmers are world leaders in the use and development of clean and sustainable technology and processes,” says Lawrence MacAulay, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food.

Dust particles in livestock facilities: Sweat the small stuff
July 19, 2017 02:40 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

A beam of sunlight streams into your living room, illuminating a Milky Way of dust particles hanging in the air. Although the air looks thick, those visible dust particles are so big that they can’t reach the smallest branches of the respiratory tree in your lungs. It’s the dust we can’t see—smaller than 2.5 microns, called PM 2.5—that can cause allergies and other respiratory problems.

Dust particles in livestock facilities: Sweat the small stuff
July 19, 2017 02:40 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

A beam of sunlight streams into your living room, illuminating a Milky Way of dust particles hanging in the air. Although the air looks thick, those visible dust particles are so big that they can’t reach the smallest branches of the respiratory tree in your lungs. It’s the dust we can’t see—smaller than 2.5 microns, called PM 2.5—that can cause allergies and other respiratory problems.

First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last