Agriculture

Study Leaves Decision On Asian Oyster to States
November 10, 2008 09:17 AM - Washington Post

A U.S. government study of the risks and rewards involved in seeding the Chesapeake Bay with an Asian oyster has found, after four years and $15 million, that the plan could have both -- punting the controversial question back to officials in Maryland and Virginia.

Eight nations warn EU over biofuel barriers
November 6, 2008 09:19 AM - http://www.reuters.com

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Eight developing countries warned the European Union on Thursday they could file a World Trade Organization complaint over what they see as unfair barriers being raised against their biofuels. A draft letter seen by Reuters called on the EU to refrain from agreeing legislation that would instruct developing nations on which parts of their territory they could use for biofuels.

Bill Clinton: "We Blew It" On Global Food
November 3, 2008 10:45 AM - , Organic Consumers Association

Today's global food crisis shows "we all blew it, including me when I was president," by treating food crops as commodities instead of as a vital right of the world's poor, Bill Clinton told a U.N. gathering on Thursday.

EU agency says French GMO maize ban unjustified
October 31, 2008 10:42 AM - Reuters

PARIS (Reuters) - Europe's top food safety agency said on Friday that France's ban on a genetically modified maize developed by U.S. biotech giant Monsanto was unjustified. Monsanto's MON 810 is the only GM crop grown in the European Union, unlike in the United States and Latin America, where they are more common. Many European countries doubt the safety of using the genetic technology in agriculture.

Less grass means less gas, cattle researcher says
October 30, 2008 10:06 AM - http://www.canada.com

A University of Manitoba scientist says he's figured out how to cut the amount of greenhouse gas belching from cows by as much as 200 litres a day - feed them grain instead of grass. For the past four years, Prof. Ermias Kebreab has been analyzing cow burps at the National Centre for Livestock and the Environment south of Winnipeg to measure the amount of methane dairy cows produce when they are fed different types of food.

Many pesticides in EU may damage human brain: study
October 24, 2008 09:28 AM - Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent

Many pesticides used in the European Union may damage brain growth in fetuses and young children, according to a study published on Friday. The study urged the European Union to tighten restrictions.

Audits could curb illegal logging
October 17, 2008 08:06 AM - http://www.thejakartapost.com

The Indonesian Forestry Ministry's bold move to require forestry companies to have their wood stocks audited throughout the supply chain to ensure the wood is derived from sustainably managed forests could go a long way in reducing illegal logging in the country. Hadi Pasaribu, the Forestry Ministry's director general for the management of forestry production, who revealed the new policy recently, did not elaborate as to when the audit -- internationally known as forest certification scheme -- would be mandatory for wood-based companies.

Ten Reasons To Buy Local Food
October 17, 2008 07:53 AM - , Organic Consumers Association

Brenton Johnson, who hosted a recent local-food gourmet dinner on his organic farm, Johnson's Backyard Garden, just east of Austin, Texas, represents a new breed of young, organic farmer whose philosophy is to live in harmony with the land and bring back the sustainable ways. Naturally (no pun intended), he advocates buying local food.

Seeking Africa's green revolution
October 8, 2008 11:20 AM - BBC

By applying a mixture of crop breeding, soil management, irrigation and diversification, agro-science experts are helping subsistence farmers to cope with climate change and buck the trend in neighbouring African countries.

Biotechnology 'no cure-all' for food insecurity
October 7, 2008 09:44 AM - , SciDevNet

[NAIROBI] Biotechnology is no panacea to the food insecurity and poverty problems in Africa and other developing countries, warned scientists at the first All Africa Congress on Biotechnology in Nairobi, Kenya, this week (23 September). "This is no silver bullet to the food insecurity in Africa and the rest of the developing world, but it must be looked at as one of the most important tools that will contribute to increased food production and thus, poverty reduction," said Clive James, chairman of the International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications.

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