Agriculture

Arctic Geese Skip Migration
September 18, 2009 11:05 AM - Michael Reilly, Discovery News

In the Fall of 2007, tens of thousands of small arctic geese called Pacific brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) decided not to go south for the winter. For these long-haul migratory birds, it was a dramatic choice -- they usually spend the cold months munching their favorite eel grass in the waters off Mexico's Baja peninsula.

Organic foods are now 'mainstream', says USDA
September 17, 2009 10:55 AM - Caroline Scott-Thomas, Food navigator-usa.com

Organic food has entered the mainstream with strong growth in all sectors over the past decade, including packaged and prepared foods and beverages, according to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Global Warming Could Cool N. America
September 16, 2009 06:16 AM - Kate Ravilious, National Geographic

Global warming could actually chill down North America within just a few decades, according to a new study that says a sudden cooling event gripped the region about 8,300 years ago.

New Carbon Dioxide Data Helps Unlock The Secrets Of Antarctic Formation

The link between declining CO2 levels in the earth's atmosphere and the formation of the Antarctic ice caps some 34 million years ago has been confirmed for the first time in a major research study.

Summer Temperatures Lower Than Normal Over Most of US
September 13, 2009 12:18 PM - R. Greenway, ENN

Global warming doesn’t necessarily mean that temperatures are rising every year, everywhere. Superimposed on global trends are local and regional climate effects that may differ from global trends. For example, the average June-August 2009 summer temperature for the contiguous United States was below average – the 34th coolest on record, according to a preliminary analysis by NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. August was also below the long-term average. The analysis is based on records dating back to 1895.

India Could Halve Emissions Growth, at a Cost
September 10, 2009 07:32 AM - Anna da Costa, Worldwatch Institute

Growth in India's carbon emissions could be nearly halved by the year 2030 through the use of known practices and technologies, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company. Through a "step-change in...efforts to lower emissions," India's carbon output could grow from 1.6 billion tons in 2005 to only 2.8 billion tons in 2030 as the country's population expands and its economy develops, the report said. This is down from a previously projected 5-6 billion tons for 2030.

Tomatoes thrive on urine diet
September 10, 2009 07:22 AM - Wagdy Sawahel, SciDevNet

Using human urine as a fertilizer produces bumper crops of tomatoes that are safe to eat, scientists have found.

ANSI Approves Green Seal Standard for Restaurants
September 9, 2009 07:26 AM - GreenerBuildings Staff, GreenBiz.com

Green Seal's certification standard for restaurants and foodservice operations has been approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), making the guidelines the first of their kind to be nationally recognized, Green Seal said today. The GS-46 Environmental Standard for Restaurants and Foodservices, released in May, is also the first Green Seal specification to be approved as an American National Standard.

Fish Farms Supply 50% of Global Harvest
September 8, 2009 11:45 AM - R. Greenway, ENN

Fish farms, once a fledgling industry, now account for 50 percent of the fish consumed globally, according to a new report by an international team of researchers. And while getting more efficient, it is putting strains on marine resources by consuming large amounts of feed made from wild fish harvested from the sea, the authors conclude. Their findings are published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Humans Causing Erosion Comparable To World’s Largest Rivers And Glaciers
September 7, 2009 07:09 AM - ScienceDaily, Adapted from materials provided by University of British Columbia

A new study finds that large-scale farming projects can erode the Earth's surface at rates comparable to those of the world's largest rivers and glaciers. Published online in the journal Nature Geoscience, the research offers stark evidence of how humans are reshaping the planet. It also finds that - contrary to previous scholarship - rivers are as powerful as glaciers at eroding landscapes.

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