Agriculture

Even short-duration heat waves could lead to failure of coffee crops
March 30, 2017 04:56 PM - Oregon State University

"Hot coffee" is not a good thing for java enthusiasts when it refers to plants beset by the high-temperature stress that this century is likely to bring, research at Oregon State University suggests.

A study by OSU’s College of Forestry showed that when Coffea arabica plants were subjected to short-duration heat waves, they became unable to produce flowers and fruit.

Making Cows More Environmentally Friendly
March 29, 2017 01:18 PM - Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

Research reveals vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane 

Making Cows More Environmentally Friendly
March 29, 2017 01:18 PM - Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

Research reveals vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane 

Steering towards grazing fields
March 29, 2017 12:47 PM - American Society of Agronomy

It makes sense that a 1,200 pound Angus cow would place quite a lot of pressure on the ground on which it walks. But a new study shows that even these heavy beasts can’t do much to compact common soils—if they’re grazed responsibly.

Steering towards grazing fields
March 29, 2017 12:47 PM - American Society of Agronomy

It makes sense that a 1,200 pound Angus cow would place quite a lot of pressure on the ground on which it walks. But a new study shows that even these heavy beasts can’t do much to compact common soils—if they’re grazed responsibly.

Mustard seeds without mustard flavor: new robust oilseed crop can resist global warming
March 28, 2017 09:46 AM - University of Copenhagen

BREAKTHROUGH - University of Copenhagen and the global player Bayer CropScience have successfully developed a new oilseed crop that is much more resistant to heat, drought and diseases than oilseed rape. The breakthrough is so big that it will feature as cover story of the April issue of Nature Biotechnology, the most prestigious journal for biotechnology research.

Mustard seeds without mustard flavor: new robust oilseed crop can resist global warming
March 28, 2017 09:46 AM - University of Copenhagen

BREAKTHROUGH - University of Copenhagen and the global player Bayer CropScience have successfully developed a new oilseed crop that is much more resistant to heat, drought and diseases than oilseed rape. The breakthrough is so big that it will feature as cover story of the April issue of Nature Biotechnology, the most prestigious journal for biotechnology research.

Farming becoming riskier under climate change
March 27, 2017 12:10 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Scientists the world over are working to predict how climate change will affect our planet. It is an extremely complex puzzle with many moving parts, but a few patterns have been consistent, including the prediction that farming as we know it will become more difficult.

Scientists infer the impact on agriculture based on predictions of rainfall, drought intensity, and weather volatility. Until now, however, the average farmer may not have been able to put predictions like these into practice. A new University of Illinois study puts climate change predictions in terms that farmers are used to: field working days.

Farming becoming riskier under climate change
March 27, 2017 12:10 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Scientists the world over are working to predict how climate change will affect our planet. It is an extremely complex puzzle with many moving parts, but a few patterns have been consistent, including the prediction that farming as we know it will become more difficult.

Scientists infer the impact on agriculture based on predictions of rainfall, drought intensity, and weather volatility. Until now, however, the average farmer may not have been able to put predictions like these into practice. A new University of Illinois study puts climate change predictions in terms that farmers are used to: field working days.

Spiral of doom: hotter world increases cattle methane emissions
March 27, 2017 10:33 AM - Oliver Tickell, The Ecologist

A vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane has been revealed in a new scientific study: as temperatures rise, forage plants get tougher and harder to digest, and cause more methane to be produced in bovine stomachs. And with cattle numbers rising and methane 85 times more powerful a greenhouse gas over 20 years, that spells trouble.

First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next | Last