Agriculture

Board game helps Mexican coffee farmers grasp complex ecological interactions
June 20, 2017 01:34 PM - University of Michigan

A chess-like board game developed by University of Michigan researchers helps small-scale Mexican coffee farmers better understand the complex interactions between the insects and fungi that live on their plants—and how some of those creatures can help provide natural pest control.

Board game helps Mexican coffee farmers grasp complex ecological interactions
June 20, 2017 01:34 PM - University of Michigan

A chess-like board game developed by University of Michigan researchers helps small-scale Mexican coffee farmers better understand the complex interactions between the insects and fungi that live on their plants—and how some of those creatures can help provide natural pest control.

NMSU professor sets his sights on determining best dryland cropping system
June 19, 2017 04:39 PM - New Mexico State University

Murali Darapuneni recalls stories about how difficult it was for his ancestors during times of drought conditions and famine in India in the early 1900s.

“They had limited resources and research at that time,” he said. “My grandparents told me about those stories and how difficult it was to feed the people.”

Darapuneni is now an assistant professor of semi-arid cropping systems in the New Mexico State University College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. Part of the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, he is researching efficient dryland cropping systems at the NMSU Agricultural Science Center at Tucumcari.

Wheat coproducts vary in protein digestibility when fed to pigs
June 19, 2017 03:40 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

Research from the University of Illinois is helping to determine the quality of protein in wheat middlings and red dog, two coproducts of the wheat milling process that can be included in diets fed to pigs and other livestock.

Unusual soybean coloration sheds a light on gene silencing
June 19, 2017 02:16 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

Today’s soybeans are typically golden yellow, with a tiny blackish mark where they attach to the pod. In a field of millions of beans, nearly all of them will have this look. Occasionally, however, a bean will turn up half-black, with a saddle pattern similar to a black-eyed pea.

Unusual soybean coloration sheds a light on gene silencing
June 19, 2017 02:16 PM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

Today’s soybeans are typically golden yellow, with a tiny blackish mark where they attach to the pod. In a field of millions of beans, nearly all of them will have this look. Occasionally, however, a bean will turn up half-black, with a saddle pattern similar to a black-eyed pea.

Ensuring the long-term success of Nova Scotia's oyster sector
June 16, 2017 08:20 AM - Dalhousie University

After much of Cape Breton’s oyster sector closed in 2002, Dr. Sarah Stewart-Clark, an assistant professor in the Department of Animal Science and Aquaculture in Dal’s Faculty of Agriculture, was determined to find a way to rebuild this 100-year-old economic and cultural activity.

The sector’s closure was the result of a pathogen found in oysters located in the Bras D’Ors Lakes. Known as the Haplosporidium nelsonii parasite (MSX), the disease causes high mortality in oyster populations but has no impact on humans.

Promising peas' potential in Big Sky Country
June 14, 2017 02:36 PM - American Society of Agronomy

Farmers in Montana, and other parts of the Northern Great Plains, are shifting from cereal mono-cropping to a cereal-dry pea cropping system. This transition is not without its share of unknowns, however.

Yield and performance of pea crops depend on both their genetics and the environment. Environmental factors such as temperature and rainfall can vary greatly. Farmers in different parts of the Plains need to know which varieties of pea will do well in the area they are farming.

Promising peas' potential in Big Sky Country
June 14, 2017 02:36 PM - American Society of Agronomy

Farmers in Montana, and other parts of the Northern Great Plains, are shifting from cereal mono-cropping to a cereal-dry pea cropping system. This transition is not without its share of unknowns, however.

Yield and performance of pea crops depend on both their genetics and the environment. Environmental factors such as temperature and rainfall can vary greatly. Farmers in different parts of the Plains need to know which varieties of pea will do well in the area they are farming.

Earning a living in a changing climate — the plant perspective
June 14, 2017 11:01 AM - Trinity College Dublin

There are many ways to make a living in a suitable climate but far fewer in a less suitable one. That may seem obvious for people living under various socio-economic stresses, but new research shows it also applies to the world’s plants – many of which are resorting to dramatic ‘last-stand’ strategies to survive in deteriorating environmental conditions.

First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next | Last