Agriculture

Spiral of doom: hotter world increases cattle methane emissions
March 27, 2017 10:33 AM - Oliver Tickell, The Ecologist

A vicious cycle of climate change, cattle diet and rising methane has been revealed in a new scientific study: as temperatures rise, forage plants get tougher and harder to digest, and cause more methane to be produced in bovine stomachs. And with cattle numbers rising and methane 85 times more powerful a greenhouse gas over 20 years, that spells trouble.

Dairy farmers should rethink a cow's curfew, say UBC researchers
March 24, 2017 08:28 AM - University of British Columbia (UBC)

Dairy cows housed indoors want to break curfew and roam free, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia, published today in Scientific Reports.

University of Toronto explores how urban agriculture intersects with social justice
March 23, 2017 08:38 AM - University of Toronto - Scarborough

As Toronto continues to grow, urban agriculture may play a more significant role for people seeking alternative sources of nutritious and affordable food, U of T researcher Colleen Hammelman says.  

 

University of Toronto explores how urban agriculture intersects with social justice
March 23, 2017 08:38 AM - University of Toronto - Scarborough

As Toronto continues to grow, urban agriculture may play a more significant role for people seeking alternative sources of nutritious and affordable food, U of T researcher Colleen Hammelman says.  

 

Wastewater should be recognized as a valuable resource, UN says on World Water Day
March 22, 2017 12:00 PM - United Nations New Centre

In a world where the demand for water continues to grow and the resource is finite, a new United Nations report argues that wastewater, discarded into the environment every day, once treated, can help meet the needs for freshwater as well as for raw materials for energy and agriculture.

Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse: study identifies options to sustain ranching and help wildlife
March 22, 2017 08:26 AM - United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications. The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University.

Spring Outlook: Risk of major flooding in North Dakota, moderate flooding in Idaho
March 21, 2017 08:37 AM - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Northern North Dakota – the Souris River, Devils Lake and the northernmost reaches of the Red River – has the greatest risk of major flooding this spring, while moderate flooding is possible over southern Idaho in the Snake River basin, according to NOAA’s Spring Outlook released today.

New UN Report Blames Pesticides for Food Insecurity
March 17, 2017 10:21 AM - Katherine Martinko, Care2

The United Nations says it’s time to overturn the myth that pesticides can feed the world and come up with better, safer ways of producing our food.

Stanford scientists reveal how grass developed a better way to breathe
March 17, 2017 10:01 AM - Stanford University

Grasses are better able to withstand drought or high temperatures than many other plants in large part due to changes in their pores, called stomata. Stanford scientists have discovered how grasses produce these altered pores, which could someday lead to crops that can better survive climate change.

Stanford scientists reveal how grass developed a better way to breathe
March 17, 2017 10:01 AM - Stanford University

Grasses are better able to withstand drought or high temperatures than many other plants in large part due to changes in their pores, called stomata. Stanford scientists have discovered how grasses produce these altered pores, which could someday lead to crops that can better survive climate change.

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