Business

Regulating the indirect land use carbon emissions from biofuels imposes high hidden costs on fuel consumers
June 27, 2017 10:14 AM - University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES)

Farmers earn more profits when there is demand for corn for biofuel instead of for food only. This can lead some to convert grasslands and forests to cropland. This conversion, also called indirect land use change, can have large-scale environmental consequences, including releasing stored carbon into the atmosphere. To penalize the carbon emissions from this so-called indirect land use change, the USEPA and California Air Resources Board include an indirect land use change factor when considering the carbon savings with biofuels for their compliance with the federal Renewable Fuel Standard or California’s Low-Carbon Fuel Standard.

Antibacterials in Many Consumer Products Cause More Harm Than Good
June 21, 2017 06:55 AM - YaleEnvironment360

Two antimicrobial chemicals already banned in antiseptic wash products by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are still found in more than 2,000 widely used consumer products, despite offering no health benefits and actually causing health and environmental harm, according to more than 200 scientists and medical professionals.

Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fields
June 2, 2017 10:01 AM - Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Money isn't always everything: Taiwanese rice farmers are willing to produce in a more environmentally friendly fashion if this would earn them an eco-label for their products. For such a label, they are even prepared to accept lower compensation payments for a reduction in the use of fertilizers. These were the findings of a study conducted by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) at the Chair Group for Agricultural Production and Resource Economics for agricultural enterprises. For this study, incentives for agri-environmental measures were investigated, such as more sustainable cultivation methods.

Are Bidets More Environmentally Friendly Than Toilet Paper?
May 31, 2017 07:23 AM - s.e. smith, Care2

While bidets remain unpopular in America, they’re a familiar fixture in bathrooms all over the world. And they raise an inevitable question: Is it better for the environment if you wipe, or should you wash instead?

The answer may surprise you — and could lead you to rethink your next bathroom remodel.

L'Oreal Takes Eco-Certification Mainstream
May 25, 2017 09:31 AM - , Triple Pundit

On Tuesday, L’Oreal achieved silver certification from the nonprofit Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute for its Biolage R.A.W. (Real – Authentic – Wholesome) haircare line, the company announced at the Sustainable Brands conference in Detroit.

L'Oreal Takes Eco-Certification Mainstream
May 25, 2017 09:31 AM - , Triple Pundit

On Tuesday, L’Oreal achieved silver certification from the nonprofit Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute for its Biolage R.A.W. (Real – Authentic – Wholesome) haircare line, the company announced at the Sustainable Brands conference in Detroit.

A Recipe For Concrete That Can Withstand Road Salt Deterioration
May 18, 2017 12:35 PM - Drexel University

Road salt, used in copious helpings each winter to protect them from ice and preserve safe driving conditions, is slowly degrading the concrete they’re made of. Engineers have known for some time that calcium chloride salt, commonly used as deicer, reacts with the calcium hydroxide in concrete to form a chemical byproduct that causes roadways to crumble.

Climate change, tornadoes and mobile homes: A dangerous mix
May 4, 2017 11:36 AM - Michigan State University

Tornadoes and mobile homes don’t mix to begin with, but throw in the volatility of climate change and the potential for massive property damage and deaths is even higher in coming decades, indicates a new study by Michigan State University researchers.

Flexible, organic and biodegradable: Stanford researchers develop new wave of electronics
May 2, 2017 09:48 PM - Sarah Derouin, Stanford University

As electronics become increasingly pervasive in our lives – from smart phones to wearable sensors – so too does the ever rising amount of electronic waste they create. A United Nations Environment Program report found that almost 50 million tons of electronic waste were thrown out in 2017—more than 20 percent higher than waste in 2015. Troubled by this mounting waste, Stanford engineer Zhenan Bao and her team are rethinking electronics. “In my group, we have been trying to mimic the function of human skin to think about how to develop future electronic devices,” Bao said. She described how skin is stretchable, self-healable and also biodegradable – an attractive list of characteristics for electronics. “We have achieved the first two [flexible and self-healing], so the biodegradability was something we wanted to tackle.”

How Changes in Rainfall Impact the World Economy
April 7, 2017 09:49 AM - Kayla Matthews, Triple Pundit

An afternoon rainstorm might seem like an inconvenience at times, but rainfall is an essential part of the world ecosystem. Most of us know this.

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