Business

The Economic Case for Wind and Solar Energy in Africa
March 28, 2017 09:33 AM - Julie Chao via Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

To meet skyrocketing demand for electricity, African countries may have to triple their energy output by 2030. While hydropower and fossil fuel power plants are favored approaches in some quarters, a new assessment by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that wind and solar can be economically and environmentally competitive options and can contribute significantly to the rising demand.

The Race to Rule the High-Flying Business of Satellite Imagery
March 28, 2017 08:48 AM - Sarah Scoles, Wired

In November 2016, satellites captured a curious change in the Tereneyskoe Forest farm in Primorsky Krai, Russia. Images showed the area transformed, from nice and leafy to stark and stumpy. An Earth-monitoring company called Astro Digital noticed the change first—and right away, it informed the World Wildlife Federation. Pixels of evidence in hand, the federation could start legal action to stop the deforestation.

The Race to Rule the High-Flying Business of Satellite Imagery
March 28, 2017 08:48 AM - Sarah Scoles, Wired

In November 2016, satellites captured a curious change in the Tereneyskoe Forest farm in Primorsky Krai, Russia. Images showed the area transformed, from nice and leafy to stark and stumpy. An Earth-monitoring company called Astro Digital noticed the change first—and right away, it informed the World Wildlife Federation. Pixels of evidence in hand, the federation could start legal action to stop the deforestation.

Rising Flood Insurance Costs a Growing Burden to Communities and Homeowners in New York City
March 27, 2017 10:10 AM - Rand Corporation

Flood insurance is already difficult to afford for many homeowners in New York City, and the situation will only worsen as flood maps are revised to reflect current risk and if the federal government continues to move toward risk-based rates, according to a first-of-its-kind study by the RAND Corporation.

Rising Flood Insurance Costs a Growing Burden to Communities and Homeowners in New York City
March 27, 2017 10:10 AM - Rand Corporation

Flood insurance is already difficult to afford for many homeowners in New York City, and the situation will only worsen as flood maps are revised to reflect current risk and if the federal government continues to move toward risk-based rates, according to a first-of-its-kind study by the RAND Corporation.

Skilled Workers More Prone to Mistakes When Interrupted
March 17, 2017 10:12 AM - Michigan State University

Expertise is clearly beneficial in the workplace, yet highly trained workers in some occupations could actually be at risk for making errors when interrupted, indicates a new study by two Michigan State University psychology researchers.

Skilled Workers More Prone to Mistakes When Interrupted
March 17, 2017 10:12 AM - Michigan State University

Expertise is clearly beneficial in the workplace, yet highly trained workers in some occupations could actually be at risk for making errors when interrupted, indicates a new study by two Michigan State University psychology researchers.

What makes farmers try new practices?
March 15, 2017 07:27 AM - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Change is never easy. But when it comes to adopting new agricultural practices, some farmers are easier to convince than others.

Fifth of food lost to over-eating and waste
February 22, 2017 07:00 AM - University of Edinburgh

Almost 20 per cent of the food made available to consumers is lost through over-eating or waste, a study suggests. 

The world population consumes around 10 per cent more food than it needs, while almost nine per cent is thrown away or left to spoil, researchers say.

Efforts to reduce the billions of tonnes lost could improve global food security – ensuring everyone has access to a safe, affordable, nutritious diet – and help prevent damage to the environment, the team says.

With Norway in Lead, Europe Set for Surge in Electric Vehicles.
February 6, 2017 01:50 PM - PAUL HOCKENOS

On Europe’s northern margins, lightly populated Norway has been at the cutting edge of electromobility for years, even decades now. The capital of Oslo, like most of Norway’s cities and towns, boasts bus-lane access for electric vehicles (EVs), recharging stations aplenty, privileged parking, and toll-free travel for electric cars. The initiative began in the 1990s as an effort to cut pollution, congestion, and noise in urban centers; now its primary rationale is combating climate change. Today, Norway has the highest per capita number of all-electric [battery only] cars in the world: more than 100,000 in a country of 5.2 million people. Last year, EVs constituted nearly 40 percent of the nation’s newly registered passenger cars.

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