Business

Swapping Where Crops are Grown Could Feed an Extra 825 Million People
November 6, 2017 11:33 AM - The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Redrawing the global map of crop distribution on existing farmland could help meet growing demand for food and biofuels in coming decades, while significantly reducing water stress in agricultural areas, according to a new study. Published today in Nature Geoscience, the study is the first to attempt to address both food production needs and resource sustainability simultaneously and at a global scale.

Farmer by Farmer, Investor by Investor, Regenerating America's Farmland
November 2, 2017 03:27 PM - Teresa Opheim, Green Money Journal

In northern Montana, Doug and Anna Jones-Crabtree restore soil health while growing organic heirloom and specialty grains, pulse and oilseed crops on 4,700 acres. A thousand miles away in Central Minnesota, the Main Street Project sequesters carbon as it transforms 100 acres of bare ground to a permaculture farm alive with hazelnut trees and foraging chickens.

Farmer by Farmer, Investor by Investor, Regenerating America's Farmland
November 2, 2017 03:27 PM - Teresa Opheim, Green Money Journal

In northern Montana, Doug and Anna Jones-Crabtree restore soil health while growing organic heirloom and specialty grains, pulse and oilseed crops on 4,700 acres. A thousand miles away in Central Minnesota, the Main Street Project sequesters carbon as it transforms 100 acres of bare ground to a permaculture farm alive with hazelnut trees and foraging chickens.

Australian Tourism Policies Fail to Address Climate Change
November 2, 2017 09:48 AM - Queensland University of Technology

Australia’s Federal and State governments are failing to produce effective long-term tourism policy to address climate change, according to the findings of new QUT-led research.

Australian Tourism Policies Fail to Address Climate Change
November 2, 2017 09:48 AM - Queensland University of Technology

Australia’s Federal and State governments are failing to produce effective long-term tourism policy to address climate change, according to the findings of new QUT-led research.

Electricity from shale gas vs. coal: Lifetime toxic releases from coal much higher
October 23, 2017 02:19 PM - University of Michigan

Despite widespread concern about potential human health impacts from hydraulic fracturing, the lifetime toxic chemical releases associated with coal-generated electricity are 10 to 100 times greater than those from electricity generated with natural gas obtained via fracking, according to a new University of Michigan study.

"Antelope Perfume" Keeps Flies Away From Cows
October 20, 2017 01:58 PM - University of Bonn

In Africa, tsetse flies transfer the sleeping sickness also to cattle. This leads to huge losses in milk, meat and manpower. The damage in Africa is estimated to be about 4.6 billion US dollars each year. Prof. Dr. Christian Borgemeister from the Center for Development Research (ZEF) at the University of Bonn and his colleagues from Kenya and the UK have developed an innovative way of preventing the disease. The scientists took advantage of the fact that tsetse flies avoid waterbucks, a widespread antelope species in Africa. The scientists imitated the smell of these antelopes. If the cattle were equipped with collars containing the defense agent, more than 80 percent of the cattle were spared from the feared infection. This research results are presented in "PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases".

Living Mulch Builds Profits, Soil
October 18, 2017 10:48 AM - American Society of Agronomy

Living mulch functions like mulch on any farm or garden except — it’s alive. No, it’s not out of the latest horror movie; living mulch is a system farmers can use to benefit both profits and the soil. While the system has been around for a while, scientists at the University of Georgia are making it more efficient and sustainable.

Exposure to environmental chemicals is an important risk factor for breast cancer
October 10, 2017 01:00 PM - Silent Spring Institute

Exposure to environmental chemicals, especially early in life, is an important contributing factor in the development of breast cancer, according to the most comprehensive review of human studies to date. The findings could help inform prevention strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of the disease, as rates continue to increase worldwide.

Clearing the air
October 2, 2017 12:45 PM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

This past June, Grace Li '17 stepped off a plane in Paris ready to spend her summer tracking down a silent killer. Now Li, her former teammates, and the flock of trained pigeons who also contributed to the project are about to get closer to their goal.

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