Climate

Cool Roofs Have Water Saving Benefits Too
October 20, 2017 01:42 PM - DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

The energy and climate benefits of cool roofs have been well established: By reflecting rather than absorbing the sun’s energy, light-colored roofs keep buildings, cities, and even the entire planet cooler. Now a new study by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that cool roofs can also save water by reducing how much is needed for urban irrigation.

NOAA, NASA team up again to investigate the atmosphere over Antarctica
October 20, 2017 08:17 AM - NOAA

Thirty years after NASA and NOAA launched a groundbreaking airborne campaign to study the Antarctic ozone hole, the two federal science agencies have once again joined forces over the world’s highest, driest and coldest continent to sniff out the secrets of the atmosphere.

On Oct. 14, NASA’s heavily instrumented DC-8 flew over Antarctica as part of the Atmospheric Tomography Mission or ATom, an unprecedented effort to sample the remote atmosphere to understand the distribution of man-made pollutants and short-lived greenhouse gases.

A New Butterflyfish— A Rare, Surprise Find— Is Described from the Philippine “Twilight Zone” and Academy Exhibit
October 19, 2017 12:04 PM - California Academy of Sciences

A newly described species of brown-and-white Philippine butterflyfish—the charismatic Roa rumsfeldi—made a fantastic, 7,000-mile journey before surprising scientists with its unknown status. Live specimens collected from 360 feet beneath the ocean’s surface in the Philippine’s Verde Island Passage escaped special notice until a single black fin spine tipped off aquarium biologists back in San Francisco. Deep-diving researchers from the California Academy of Sciences’ Hope for Reefs team—with genetic sequencing help from a parent–son team—share their discovery of a fifth species of Roa this week in ZooKeys.

Impact of Amazonian Hydropower is 'Significantly Underestimated', Study Finds
October 19, 2017 11:48 AM - University of Stirling

The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research.

Impact of Amazonian Hydropower is 'Significantly Underestimated', Study Finds
October 19, 2017 11:48 AM - University of Stirling

The environmental impact of hydropower generation in the Amazon may be greater than predicted, according to new University of Stirling research.

Fossil coral reefs show sea level rose in bursts during last warming
October 19, 2017 11:27 AM - Rice University

Scientists from Rice University and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi’s Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies have discovered that Earth’s sea level did not rise steadily but rather in sharp, punctuated bursts when the planet’s glaciers melted during the period of global warming at the close of the last ice age. The researchers found fossil evidence in drowned reefs offshore Texas that showed sea level rose in several bursts ranging in length from a few decades to one century.

Carbon Feedback from Forest Soils will Accelerate Global Warming, 26-Year Study Projects
October 19, 2017 11:13 AM - Diana Kenney

After 26 years, the world’s longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. Overall, the results indicate that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncontrollable carbon feedback will occur between forest soils and the climate system, adding to the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide caused by burning fossil fuels and accelerating global warming. The study, led by Jerry Melillo, Distinguished Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory(MBL), appears in the October 6 issue of Science.

Carbon Feedback from Forest Soils will Accelerate Global Warming, 26-Year Study Projects
October 19, 2017 11:13 AM - Diana Kenney

After 26 years, the world’s longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. Overall, the results indicate that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncontrollable carbon feedback will occur between forest soils and the climate system, adding to the build-up of atmospheric carbon dioxide caused by burning fossil fuels and accelerating global warming. The study, led by Jerry Melillo, Distinguished Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory(MBL), appears in the October 6 issue of Science.

Ice stream retreats under a cold climate
October 19, 2017 10:59 AM - University of Helsinki

Why did the Jakobshavn Isbræ ice stream in West Greenland retreat under a cold climate period called the Younger Dryas?

Forest fires on the rise as JRC study warns of danger to air quality
October 19, 2017 10:48 AM - European Commission Joint Research Centre

The JRC’s annual forest fires report confirms a trend towards longer and more intense fire seasons in Europe and neighbouring regions, with wildfires now occurring throughout the year. The report coincides with an international study which finds that global wildfire trends could have significant health implications due to rising harmful emissions.

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