Climate

Merged climate, pollution fight seen saving cash
February 12, 2009 09:14 AM - WBCSD

Merging separate fights against air pollution and climate change could save cash and encourage developing nations such as China to do more to curb global warming, researchers said on Wednesday. "There are big gains to be made" from a combined policy, said Petter Tollefsen, a researcher at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research, Oslo (CICERO).

$400 billion: The price of our future
February 11, 2009 11:02 AM - New Scientist

Just $400 billion - 0.8% of global GDP. That's how much money one of the world's leading economists says governments around the world need to put towards "green" policies that will ensure global finances and the global environment prosper in the 21st century. There's a catch, and it's a big one: the money needs to be set aside by this summer and spent by mid-2010.

Scottish ski industry could disappear due to global warming, warns Met Office
February 11, 2009 10:14 AM - Telegraph UK

The country's five resorts are currently enjoying exceptional conditions after heavy snowfall in the Highlands, but climate change may mean they have less than 50 years of ski-ing left. Alex Hill, chief government advisor with the Met Office, said the amount of snow in the Scottish mountains had been decreasing for the last 40 years and there was no reason for the decline to stop.

Landmark Global Warming Lawsuit Settled
February 10, 2009 08:50 AM - SustainableBusiness.com News

A federal lawsuit that sought to force two U.S. agencies to address the global warming implications of their overseas financing activities was settled Friday after more than six years. The suit established important legal precedents related to global warming.

Big Year For Darwin, But What Would He Make Of The Climate Change Ahead?
February 10, 2009 08:44 AM - Rutgers University

Charles Darwin may have been born 200 years ago come Feb. 12, but his theory of evolution remains an everyday touchstone for modern biologists. And while the Origin of Species author might not have known the term "global warming," he wouldn’t have been surprised that the environment is changing. He would, however, be astonished by the speed at which it's happening today, researchers believe. "Every species is under temporary permanence," says Bill Saidel, an associate professor of biology at Rutgers University's Camden Campus, where he teaches Animal Behavior and Behavioral Neurobiology. Darwin would have predicted changes in species' habits and even changes in the environment, but the planet's facing changes that are both drastic and unpredictable.

Fires, floods pressure Australia govt on climate
February 9, 2009 09:16 AM - Reuters

Australia's deadliest wildfires increased pressure on the national government to take firm action on climate change on Monday as scientists said global warming likely contributed to conditions that fuelled the disaster. At least 130 people were killed in wildfires, set off by a record heatwave in southern Victoria state over the past week days, while large areas of Queensland state remain flooded by tropical downpours.

Climate issues emerging as new focus for U.S. and China
February 6, 2009 09:03 AM - WBCSD

When Chinese officials and the administration of President Barack Obama begin discussions in earnest over issues at the heart of relations between the United States and China, the usual suspects will no doubt emerge: trade, human rights, Taiwan. But increasingly, officials and scholars from both countries say, the global problem of climate change could become another focal point in the dialogue.

Collapse Of Antarctic Ice Sheet Would Likely Put Washington, D.C. Largely Underwater
February 6, 2009 08:54 AM - University of Toronto

University of Toronto and Oregon State University geophysicists have shown that should the West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse and melt in a warming world – as many scientists are concerned it will – it is the coastlines of North America and of nations in the southern Indian Ocean that will face the greatest threats from rising sea levels. The catastrophic increase in sea level, already projected to average between 16 and 17 feet around the world, would be almost 21 feet in such places as Washington, D.C., scientists say, putting it largely underwater. Many coastal areas would be devastated. Much of Southern Florida would disappear, according to researchers at Oregon State University.

More Extreme Weather In The Arctic Regions
February 5, 2009 10:55 AM - University of Bergen

A new study published in Climate Dynamics by Erik Kolstad and Thomas J. Bracegirdle reveals that one of the most visible signs of climate change is the dramatically reduced ice cover in the Arctic. The retreat of the sea ice leads to rapid changes in the weather conditions in these areas. The study reveals that regions that have been covered by sea ice until now will be exposed to new kinds of severe weather. This may have dire consequences for human activities in the Northern regions.

U.N. chief says domestic politics undermine climate fight
February 5, 2009 09:16 AM - Reuters

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - A climate deal at Copenhagen may not be possible unless politicians take tough decisions without worrying about winning elections and compulsions of their domestic politics, the U.N. Secretary-General said on Thursday. Ban Ki-moon said the situation had been compounded by the global financial downturn that was making it more difficult for the political leadership to take unpopular decisions.

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