Climate

Global warming meetings put focus on U.S. role
September 23, 2007 10:44 AM - Deborah Zabarenko -Reuters

A trio of climate change meetings in the United States this week will focus attention on how Washington can deliver on its pledge to play a lead role in combating global warming.

The central issue is how to curb the emission of climate-warming greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide from coal-fired power plants and petroleum-fueled vehicles, and whether to make the goals mandatory or "aspirational" as the White House has proposed.

New tropical storm seen forming over open Atlantic
September 23, 2007 10:42 AM - Reuters

A subtropical depression formed over the Atlantic Ocean on Sunday and U.S. forecasters said it was expected to strengthen into a tropical storm later in the day.

Ivo weakens to tropical storm near Mexico
September 22, 2007 06:51 PM -

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Hurricane Ivo weakened to a tropical storm on Friday on its way to Mexico's Baja California peninsula, where it is due to make landfall in a sparsely populated desert area in the coming days.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Ivo had maximum sustained winds of 70 mph (112 kph), making it less than hurricane strength.

Ozone deal called boost to fighting climate change
September 22, 2007 06:47 PM - David Ljunggren, Reuters

OTTAWA (Reuters) - A deal by 191 nations to eliminate ozone-depleting substances 10 years ahead of schedule is a "pivotal moment" in the fight against global warming, Canadian Environment Minister John Baird said on Saturday.

Delegates at a U.N. conference in Montreal struck the deal late on Friday. The agreement will phase out production and use of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) for developed countries to 2020 from 2030 and to 2030 from 2040 for developing nations.

The United Nations also hailed the deal, saying it could cut billions of tones in greenhouse gas emissions.

Deal reached on cutting ozone-damaging emissions
September 22, 2007 08:53 AM - Reuters

Delegates from almost 200 countries agreed late on Friday to eliminate ozone-depleting substances faster than originally planned, the United Nations said.

Tropical depression Forms In Gulf
September 21, 2007 12:01 PM -

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Subtropical Depression 10 in the Gulf of Mexico strengthened Friday into a tropical depression, the National Hurricane Center said in a report.

The NHC said the center of the depression was located about 50 miles southwest of Apalachicola, Florida, and about 155 miles east-southeast of Mobile, Alabama.

The depression, which is packing winds near 35 miles per hour, was moving toward the northwest near 11 mph. The NHC in a report at 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT) predicted the storm would turn to the west-northwest during the next 24 hours.

La Nina may impact global weather into 2008
September 21, 2007 11:35 AM - Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The weather anomaly La Nina could influence global weather patterns through the early part of 2008, according to the National Weather Service.

The U.S. agency said La Nina conditions have developed across the equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past few months, though some forecasting models have predicted a more rapid development than has occurred.

La Nina, which means "little girl" in Spanish, is an unusual cooling of Pacific Ocean surface temperatures and can trigger widespread changes in weather around the world, including a higher-than-normal number of hurricanes in the Atlantic.

Arctic Ice Ebbs To Record Level: Scientists
September 21, 2007 08:12 AM - Reuters

WASHINGTON - Arctic sea ice melted to its lowest level ever this week, shattering a record set in 2005 and continuing a trend spurred by human-caused global warming, scientists said on Thursday.  "It's the biggest drop from a previous record that we've ever had and it's really quite astounding," said Walt Meier, a research scientist at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center in Colorado.

Developing Nation Splits May Hinder Climate Talks
September 21, 2007 07:53 AM - Reuters

LONDON - Talks on global warming in the United States next week may be complicated by differences among developing countries as their climate policy positions diverge.  All agree that the rich should take a lead in tackling climate change after enjoying more than two centuries of economic growth fuelled by burning coal and oil.  The differences will emerge on when and under what terms developing nations shoulder a greater burden in cutting their own growing greenhouse gas emissions.

Ancient British Bog May Hold Climate Change Clues
September 20, 2007 12:17 PM - Michael Kahn, Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - An ancient British bog that pumped out high amounts of greenhouse gases during a period of global warming 55 million years ago may offer clues about future climate change, researchers said on Wednesday.

An analysis of sediments from the bog suggests that global warming caused methane emissions to rise in the wetlands, which in turn sent temperatures there even higher, the researchers said.

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