Climate

Declining Aral Sea: Satellite Images Highlight Dramatic Retreat
July 12, 2009 07:03 AM - Editor ENN, adapted from materials from the European Space Agency

Envisat images highlight the dramatic retreat of the Aral Sea’s shoreline from 2006 to 2009. The Aral Sea was once the world’s fourth-largest inland body of water, but it has been steadily shrinking over the past 50 years since the rivers that fed it were diverted for irrigation projects. By the end of the 1980s, it had split into the Small Aral Sea (north), located in Kazakhstan, and the horse-shoe shaped Large Aral Sea (south), shared by Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

Climate Bill Debate Postponed By Senate
July 11, 2009 06:43 AM - Christopher Joyce, NPR

Legislation to slow climate change rolled into the Senate this week and almost immediately ground to a halt. After two days of hearings, Democratic leaders agreed to mothball the measure until September. They blamed a full schedule on health care reform and the president's Supreme Court nominee for the delay.

Buses May Aid Climate Battle in Poor Cities
July 10, 2009 11:14 AM - Elisabeth Rosenthal, New York Times

Emissions from vehicles in the booming cities of Asia, Africa and Latin America account for a rapidly growing component of heat-trapping gases linked to global warming. Rapid transit systems like Bogotá’s may hold a key to combating climate change.

Climate Talks End With Meager Promises
July 10, 2009 08:10 AM - Richard Harris, NPR

International climate talks held in Italy this week ended with little progress. The rich industrial nations wouldn't promise to cut back their emissions in the near term. And China, India and the rest of the developing world wouldn't commit to cutting their emissions, ever. All nations of the world need to act to reduce the risk of a climate catastrophe. But so far, there's much more posturing than action.

Ice Volume Of Switzerland’s Glaciers Calculated
July 9, 2009 10:26 AM - ScienceDaily

Swiss glaciers have lost a lot of ice in recent years due to increased melting. As temperatures climb, so do the fears that the glaciers could one day disappear altogether.

G8 Urges Economic Stability Measures, Fails to Pass Climate Bill
July 9, 2009 06:45 AM - , Triple Pundit

Today in L’Aquila, Italy, the Group of 8 (G8) Summit failed to pass unanimously a climate bill which would have mandated halving of global CO2 emissions by 2050 as part of the Group’s larger economic-stabilization plan. The Group – consisting of the United States, Japan, Germany, France, Great Britain, Italy, Canada, and Russia – believed passage of the bill would likely have broken the deadlock over sharing of the burden of cutting greenhouse gasses. The bill’s passage also would have laid the groundwork for an expected future U.N. climate pact in Copenhagen in December.

Comment on: Princeton Plan Emerges as the Robin Hood of National Emissions Policy
July 8, 2009 03:00 PM - M Molendyke, ENN Community

Comment on a study published yesterday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the article "Sharing Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions Among 1 Billion High Emitters," compiled by numerous Princeton professors and researchers, among others from Harvard and abroad, is calling for new policy regarding international caps on carbon emissions.

Did an Ancient Volcano Freeze Earth?

A new study puts to rest questions about whether an ancient volcanic eruption plunged Earth into a 1000-year deep freeze and whether an equivalent event today could jump-start a new, millennium-long ice age.

NASA Satellite Survey Reveals Dramatic Arctic Sea Ice Thinning measurements of winter sea ice thickness over Arctic Ocean, 2004 and 2008
July 8, 2009 06:44 AM - Editor, ENN

A new research paper published by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows that arctic sea ice thinned dramatically between the winters of 2004 and 2008, with thin seasonal ice replacing thick older ice as the dominant type for the first time on record. The new results, based on data from a NASA Earth-orbiting spacecraft, provide further evidence for the rapid, ongoing transformation of the Arctic's ice cover.

Great Barrier Reef will be gone in 20 years, says Charlie Veron
July 7, 2009 11:07 AM - Frank Pope, Times Online

The Great Barrier Reef will be so degraded by warming waters that it will be unrecognizable within 20 years, an eminent marine scientist has said.

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