Climate

Arctic Ecosystems Changing, May be Irreversible
September 11, 2009 07:27 AM - Andrea Thompson, Live Science

The dramatic changes sweeping the Arctic as a result of global warming aren't just confined to melting sea ice and polar bears — a new study finds that the forces of climate change are propagating throughout the frigid north, producing different effects in each ecosystem with the upshot that the face of the Arctic may be forever altered.

India Could Halve Emissions Growth, at a Cost
September 10, 2009 07:32 AM - Anna da Costa, Worldwatch Institute

Growth in India's carbon emissions could be nearly halved by the year 2030 through the use of known practices and technologies, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company. Through a "step-change in...efforts to lower emissions," India's carbon output could grow from 1.6 billion tons in 2005 to only 2.8 billion tons in 2030 as the country's population expands and its economy develops, the report said. This is down from a previously projected 5-6 billion tons for 2030.

Salazar says U.S. climate bill high on agenda
September 9, 2009 09:49 AM - Richard Cowan, Reuters

Despite Washington's nearly single-minded focus on healthcare reform, the Obama administration still expects the U.S. Senate to pass climate change legislation, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said on Tuesday.

Fish Farms Supply 50% of Global Harvest
September 8, 2009 11:45 AM - R. Greenway, ENN

Fish farms, once a fledgling industry, now account for 50 percent of the fish consumed globally, according to a new report by an international team of researchers. And while getting more efficient, it is putting strains on marine resources by consuming large amounts of feed made from wild fish harvested from the sea, the authors conclude. Their findings are published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Maldives to introduce green tax on tourists
September 8, 2009 07:18 AM - Ranga Sirilal, Reuters

The Maldives archipelago, threatened by rising sea levels blamed on climate change, said on Monday it would introduce a new environment tax on all tourists who use its resorts and provide its economic lifeline.

Humans Causing Erosion Comparable To World’s Largest Rivers And Glaciers
September 7, 2009 07:09 AM - ScienceDaily, Adapted from materials provided by University of British Columbia

A new study finds that large-scale farming projects can erode the Earth's surface at rates comparable to those of the world's largest rivers and glaciers. Published online in the journal Nature Geoscience, the research offers stark evidence of how humans are reshaping the planet. It also finds that - contrary to previous scholarship - rivers are as powerful as glaciers at eroding landscapes.

Methane Gas Could Increase From Oceanic Vents
September 6, 2009 08:03 AM - Roger Greenway, ENN

New MIT research by Denise Brehm, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy looked at the potential for a compound affect of warming global temperatures on the level of methane being released by oceanic vents. The premise is that rising global temperatures could be accompanied by melting permafrost in arctic regions and that this could initiate the release of underground methane into the atmosphere. Once released, that methane gas would speed up global warming by trapping the Earth's heat radiation about 20 times more efficiently than does the better-known greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide.

Arctic Geological Record Correlates Warming to Man
September 5, 2009 11:52 AM - Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times

Long-term climate records from the Arctic provide strong new evidence that human-caused global warming can override Earth's natural heating and cooling cycles, U.S. researchers reported this week in the journal Science.

Iraq’s new war is a fight for water
September 4, 2009 08:32 AM - Phil Sands and Nizar Latif, The National

As bombs continue to tear apart its towns and villages, Iraq is now in the grip of an environmental crisis that experts and officials warn may do what decades of war have not been able to – destroy the country. The new war on Iraq, say some, "is a war of water".

Arctic Warming Overtakes 2,000 Years of Natural Cooling
September 4, 2009 07:42 AM - Roger Greenway, ENN

Arctic temperatures have been dropping for the last 2,000 years. Since 1900, temperature anomaly has turned positive, indicating temperatures started becoming warmer than the long term average, new research indicates. The study, which incorporates geologic records and computer simulations, provides new evidence that the Arctic would be cooling if not for greenhouse gas emissions that are overpowering natural climate patterns. The Summer temperature anomaly changed from about – 1 to + 1 which is a very large change.

First | Previous | 358 | 359 | 360 | 361 | 362 | Next | Last