Climate

Corals and climate change
August 22, 2007 03:52 PM - University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science

VIRGINIA KEY, FL (August 22, 2007) — A modest new lab at the Rosenstiel School is the first of its kind to tackle the global problem of climate change impacts on corals. Fully operational this month, this new lab has begun to study how corals respond to the combined stress of greenhouse warming and ocean acidification. The lab is the first to maintain corals under precisely controlled temperature and carbon dioxide conditions while exposing them to natural light conditions.

ODP scientists say no large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets 41 million years ago
August 22, 2007 03:49 PM - Joint Oceanographic Institutions

New research to test global ice volume approximately 41.6 million years ago shows that ice caps at this time, if they existed at all, would have been small and easily accommodated on Antarctica.

University of Miami Offers A New Way to Look At Bleaching, Ocean Acidity, & Global Warming
August 22, 2007 03:45 PM - Univeristy of Miami

A modest new lab at the Rosenstiel School, at the University of Miami, is the first of its kind to tackle the global problem of climate change impacts on corals.

Researchers Urge Officials To Study Indirect Impacts of Fossil Fuels
August 22, 2007 03:23 PM - Carnegie Mellon

A team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers report that the choices U.S. officials make today could limit how the nation's future energy needs are met and could cost consumers billions in idle power plants and associated infrastructure systems.

Antarctic Ice Thawing Faster Than Predicted
August 22, 2007 03:14 PM - Alister Doyle, Reuters Environment Correspondent

NY ALESUND, Norway - A thaw of Antarctic ice is outpacing predictions by the U.N. climate panel and could in the worst case drive up world sea levels by 2 meters (6 ft) by 2100, a leading expert said on Wednesday. Millions of people, from Bangladesh to Florida and some Pacific island states, live less than a meter above sea level. Most of the world's major cities, from Shanghai to Buenos Aires, are by the sea.

Kyoto gives chemical plants windfall: UNEP
August 22, 2007 02:24 PM - Gerard Wynn -Reuters

Chemical plants in China can earn substantial windfall profits by destroying powerful greenhouse gases, underlining the need for changes to the rules of a Kyoto Protocol incentives scheme, a U.N. report shows.

North American Group Agrees To 2020 Carbon Cuts
August 22, 2007 02:22 PM - Reuters

Western U.S. states and Canadian provinces said on Wednesday they agreed to cut emissions linked to global warming by 15 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. The group, spearheaded by California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, is the latest effort by U.S. states to bypass President George W. Bush on regulating greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

Study Casts Doubt On Earlier Ice Cap Research
August 22, 2007 01:53 PM - Michael Kahn, Reuters

LONDON - Pinhead-sized fossils buried deep under the ocean show that glaciers did not coat the poles 41 million years ago, a new study shows, disputing earlier research that suggested huge ice sheets covered the Earth's extremities. Any glaciers then -- a time when the planet was much warmer -- would only have been in small areas in Antarctica's interior and not in the Northern hemisphere, said Paul Wilson, from Britain's National Oceanography Centre, who led the study.

High temperatures, low precipitation creating many problems
August 22, 2007 12:08 PM - Purdue University

The hot, dry conditions in Indiana may have one bright spot - creating a more fiery display of fall leaves in some parts of the state. But that's not much solace for farmers, gardeners, boaters and fishermen plagued by a weather system that shows no signs of dissipating soon.

Report: Lake Tahoe Has Fewer Cold Days, Less Snow, Warmer Water
August 22, 2007 11:01 AM - UC Davis

Lake Tahoe, California - Overall, the most striking data in a new report are those showing that the Tahoe climate is warming up. This trend could have profound implications for the natural features that make Tahoe a popular international vacation destination: snowfall in winter and the beautiful cobalt-blue lake in summer. This news comes from UC Davis, which has released the first in a new series of annual reports designed to give the non-scientific community an unprecedented compendium of information that documents changing water quality and weather conditions in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

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