Climate

Polar Bears Have a Fighting Chance of Survival
December 16, 2010 09:27 AM - David A Gabel, ENN

The plight of polar bears continues as the climate gradually becomes warmer in the Arctic. Warmer temperatures cause the melting of sea ice, which is essential for polar bears to reach their prey, primarily seals. However, according to a recent study published in the journal, Nature, polar bears have a good chance at survival if humans significantly reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

NASA releases global warming map
December 16, 2010 08:24 AM - Editor, MONGABAY.COM

NASA has released a new analysis of temperature change. The map shows temperature anomalies for 2000-2009 and 1970-1979 relative to a 1951-1980 baseline.

EarthTalk: What is Global Dimming?
December 16, 2010 08:14 AM - Thomas Schueneman, Global Warming is Real

Global dimming is a less well-known but real phenomenon resulting from atmospheric pollution. The burning of fossil fuels by industry and internal combustion engines, in addition to releasing the carbon dioxide that collects and traps the sun's heat within our atmosphere, causes the emission of so-called particulate pollution—composed primarily of sulphur dioxide, soot and ash. When these particulates enter the atmosphere they absorb solar energy and reflect sunlight otherwise bound for the Earth’s surface back into space.

Climate change affects toads, salamanders
December 15, 2010 09:04 AM - Reuters

Climate change is affecting the breeding cycles of toads and salamanders, researchers reported on Tuesday, in the first published evidence of such changes on amphibians. They documented that two species were breeding later in the autumn than in years past, and two others were breeding earlier in the winter. Their study, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, adds to a growing body of evidence that climate change is affecting animals. Other studies have shown some birds in North America and Europe are moving northwards as temperatures rise.

Court Denies Stay of EPA Climate Rules
December 14, 2010 08:17 AM - Jonathan Kalmuss-Katz, Sive Paget & Riesel, P.C.

EPA can enforce its climate change regulations while litigation challenging those regulations is pending, a federal appeals court ruled last Friday. The denial of a motion to stay the implementation of EPA's rules removed one of the final barriers to implementation of the Agency's first-ever stationary source greenhouse gas ("GHG") limits, which are scheduled to begin phasing in on January 2, 2011.

Climate talks end with modest steps
December 12, 2010 06:52 AM - Russell Blinch and Chris Buckley, Reuters, CANCUN, Mexico

The world's governments agreed on Saturday to modest steps to combat climate change and to give more money to poor countries, but they put off until next year tough decisions on cutting greenhouse gas emissions. The deal includes a Green Climate Fund that would give $100 billion a year in aid to poor nations by 2020, measures to protect tropical forests and ways to share clean energy technologies. Ending a marathon session of talks in the Mexican beach resort of Cancun, almost 200 countries also set a target of limiting a rise in average world temperatures to below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 F) over pre-industrial times.

Cold weather killing Florida's manatees
December 11, 2010 09:08 AM - Reuters, ST. PETERSBURG, Florida

Unusually cold weather last winter killed Florida's endangered manatees at a record rate, a report said on Friday. During 2010, a record 699 manatees have died in Florida, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Research Institute. Of those, 244 were attributed to cold weather and many of the 271 undetermined deaths were also likely caused by weather. In most years, the leading cause of manatee deaths is from collisions with power boats. The latest surveys estimate there are only about 5,000 of the chubby marine mammals left in Florida waters.

Greenland Ice Sheet Flow Driven by Short-Term Weather Extremes, Not Gradual Warming, Research Reveals
December 10, 2010 10:49 AM - Editor, Science Daily

Sudden changes in the volume of meltwater contribute more to the acceleration -- and eventual loss -- of the Greenland ice sheet than the gradual increase of temperature, according to a University of British Columbia study.

U.N. talks on knife edge, Mexico urges agreement
December 10, 2010 07:14 AM - Russell Blinch and Timothy Gardner, Reuters, CANCUN, Mexico

Talks on a 190-nation deal to slow global warming were on a "knife edge" early on Friday as Brazil and Japan expressed guarded hopes of ending a dispute between rich and poor about curbing greenhouse gas emissions. Negotiators were set to work well into the early hours of the morning seeking to end a standoff over the future of the U.N.'s Kyoto Protocol, which binds almost 40 rich nations to curb emissions until 2012, before the final day of the two-week talks on Friday.

'Greener' Climate Prediction Shows Plants Slow Warming
December 8, 2010 03:16 PM - Editor, Science Daily

ScienceDaily (Dec. 8, 2010) — A new NASA computer modeling effort has found that additional growth of plants and trees in a world with doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide levels would create a new negative feedback -- a cooling effect -- in the Earth's climate system that could work to reduce future global warming.

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