Climate

Climate change could trigger strong sea level rise
January 5, 2017 04:08 PM - University of Bonn

About 15,000 years ago, the ocean around Antarctica has seen an abrupt sea level rise of several meters. It could happen again. An international team of scientists with the participation of the University of Bonn is now reporting its findings in the magazine Nature Scientific Reports.

Hot weather not to blame for Salmonella on egg farms
January 5, 2017 10:30 AM - University of Adelaide

New research conducted by the University of Adelaide shows there is no greater risk of Salmonella contamination in the production of free range eggs due to hot summer weather, compared with other seasons.

More frequent hurricanes not necessarily stronger on Atlantic coast
January 5, 2017 10:20 AM - University of Wisconsin-Madison

Active Atlantic hurricane periods, like the one we are in now, are not necessarily a harbinger of more, rapidly intensifying hurricanes along the U.S. coast, according to new research performed at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. 

More frequent hurricanes not necessarily stronger on Atlantic coast
January 5, 2017 10:20 AM - University of Wisconsin-Madison

Active Atlantic hurricane periods, like the one we are in now, are not necessarily a harbinger of more, rapidly intensifying hurricanes along the U.S. coast, according to new research performed at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. 

What Satellites Can Tell Us About How Animals Will Fare in a Changing Climate
December 27, 2016 07:37 AM - NASA

From the Arctic to the Mojave Desert, terrestrial and marine habitats are rapidly changing. These changes impact animals that are adapted to specific ecological niches, sometimes displacing them or reducing their numbers. From their privileged vantage point, satellites are particularly well-suited to observe habitat transformation and help scientists forecast impacts on the distribution, abundance and migration of animals.

Global climate target could net additional six million tons of fish annually
December 24, 2016 07:50 AM - University of British Columbia

If countries abide by the Paris Agreement global warming target of 1.5 degrees Celsius, potential fish catches could increase by six million metric tons per year, according to a new study published in Science.

The researchers also found that some oceans are more sensitive to changes in temperature and will have substantially larger gains from achieving the Paris Agreement.

Could Rudolph and friends help to slow down our warming climate?
December 22, 2016 07:19 AM - IOP Publishing

Reindeer may be best known for pulling Santa’s sleigh, but a new study suggests they may have a part to play in slowing down climate change too.

A team of researchers, writing in the journal Environmental Research Letters, found that when reindeer reduce the height and abundance of shrubs on the Arctic tundra through grazing, the level of surface albedo – the amount of solar energy (shortwave radiation) reflected by the Earth back into space – is increased.

 

Scientists bear witness to birth of an ice cloud
December 20, 2016 12:47 PM - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

RICHLAND, Wash. – Scientists have witnessed the birth of atmospheric ice clouds, creating ice cloud crystals in the laboratory and then taking images of the process through a microscope, essentially documenting the very first steps of cloud formation.

Scientists bear witness to birth of an ice cloud
December 20, 2016 12:47 PM - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

RICHLAND, Wash. – Scientists have witnessed the birth of atmospheric ice clouds, creating ice cloud crystals in the laboratory and then taking images of the process through a microscope, essentially documenting the very first steps of cloud formation.

Scientists: Strong evidence that human-caused climate change intensified 2015 heat waves
December 20, 2016 08:22 AM - NOAA

Human-caused climate change very likely increased the severity of heat waves that plagued India, Pakistan, Europe, East Africa, East Asia, and Australia in 2015 and helped make it the warmest year on record, according to new research published today in a special edition of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.  

The fifth edition of Explaining Extreme Events from a Climate Perspective presents 25 peer-reviewed research papers that examine episodes of extreme weather of 2015 over five continents and two oceans. It features the research of 116 scientists from 18 countries analyzing both historical observations and changing trends along with model results to determine whether and how climate change may have influenced the event.

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