Climate

In Iceland Stream, Possible Glimpse of Warming Future
October 4, 2017 04:26 PM - University of Alabama

When a normally cold stream in Iceland was warmed, the make-up of life inside changed as larger organisms thrived while smaller ones struggled, according to two papers published by researchers from The University of Alabama.

Climate Change Will Make for More Turbulent Flights
October 4, 2017 04:19 PM - Yale Environment 360

Climate change will significantly increase the incidence of severe turbulence worldwide — as much as tripling it in some spots — by mid-century, resulting in much bumpier flights and a rise in costly in-flight injuries, according to a new study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Fish Shrinking as Ocean Temperatures Rise
October 4, 2017 04:11 PM - Louisiana State University

One of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner published today. The average body size of Menhaden — a small, silver fish — caught off the coasts from Maine to Texas — has shrunk by about 15 percent over the past 65 years.

Fish Shrinking as Ocean Temperatures Rise
October 4, 2017 04:11 PM - Louisiana State University

One of the most economically important fish is shrinking in body weight, length and overall physical size as ocean temperatures rise, according to new research by LSU Boyd Professor R. Eugene Turner published today. The average body size of Menhaden — a small, silver fish — caught off the coasts from Maine to Texas — has shrunk by about 15 percent over the past 65 years.

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology
October 4, 2017 09:02 AM - Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Predicting how climate change will affect the incidence of infectious diseases would have great public health benefits. But the relationship between climate and disease is extraordinarily complex, making such predictions difficult. Simply identifying correlations and statistical associations between climatic factors and disease won’t be enough, said Princeton University researcher Jessica Metcalf. Instead, researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate–disease relationship, accounting for uncertainties in both.

To Predict How Climate Change Will Affect Disease, Researchers Must Fuse Climate Science and Biology
October 4, 2017 09:02 AM - Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Predicting how climate change will affect the incidence of infectious diseases would have great public health benefits. But the relationship between climate and disease is extraordinarily complex, making such predictions difficult. Simply identifying correlations and statistical associations between climatic factors and disease won’t be enough, said Princeton University researcher Jessica Metcalf. Instead, researchers need new statistical models that incorporate both climate factors and the climate–disease relationship, accounting for uncertainties in both.

Winter Cold Extremes Linked to High-Altitude Polar Vortex Weakening
October 4, 2017 08:58 AM - Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

When the strong winds that circle the Arctic slacken, cold polar air can escape and cause extreme winter chills in parts of the Northern hemisphere. A new study finds that these weak states have become more persistent over the past four decades and can be linked to cold winters in Russia and Europe. It is the first to show that changes in winds high up in the stratosphere substantially contributed to the observed winter cooling trend in northern Eurasia. While it is still a subject of research how the Arctic under climate change impacts the rest of the world, this study lends further support that a changing Arctic impacts the weather across large swaths of the Northern Hemisphere population centers.

Winter Cold Extremes Linked to High-Altitude Polar Vortex Weakening
October 4, 2017 08:58 AM - Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

When the strong winds that circle the Arctic slacken, cold polar air can escape and cause extreme winter chills in parts of the Northern hemisphere. A new study finds that these weak states have become more persistent over the past four decades and can be linked to cold winters in Russia and Europe. It is the first to show that changes in winds high up in the stratosphere substantially contributed to the observed winter cooling trend in northern Eurasia. While it is still a subject of research how the Arctic under climate change impacts the rest of the world, this study lends further support that a changing Arctic impacts the weather across large swaths of the Northern Hemisphere population centers.

Fly Away Home? Ice Age May Have Clipped Bird Migration
October 4, 2017 08:54 AM - University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The onset of the last ice age may have forced some bird species to abandon their northerly migrations for thousands of years, says new research led by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln ornithologist.

Fly Away Home? Ice Age May Have Clipped Bird Migration
October 4, 2017 08:54 AM - University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The onset of the last ice age may have forced some bird species to abandon their northerly migrations for thousands of years, says new research led by a University of Nebraska-Lincoln ornithologist.

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