Climate

Solar material for producing clean hydrogen fuel
June 14, 2017 11:22 AM - Osaka University

Global climate change and the energy crisis mean that alternatives to fossil fuels are urgently needed. Among the cleanest low-carbon fuels is hydrogen, which can react with oxygen to release energy, emitting nothing more harmful than water (H2O) as the product. However, most hydrogen on earth is already locked into H2O (or other molecules), and cannot be used for power.

Wildfires Pollute Much More Than Previously Thought
June 14, 2017 11:12 AM - Georgia Institute of Technology

Summer wildfires boost air pollution considerably more than previously believed.

Naturally burning timber and brush launch what are called fine particles into the air at a rate three times as high as levels noted in emissions inventories at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study. The microscopic specks that form aerosols are a hazard to human health, particularly to the lungs and heart.

Earning a living in a changing climate — the plant perspective
June 14, 2017 11:01 AM - Trinity College Dublin

There are many ways to make a living in a suitable climate but far fewer in a less suitable one. That may seem obvious for people living under various socio-economic stresses, but new research shows it also applies to the world’s plants – many of which are resorting to dramatic ‘last-stand’ strategies to survive in deteriorating environmental conditions.

Building to better weather the storm
June 14, 2017 08:11 AM - MIT

The Atlantic hurricane season has officially begun and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is predicting “above normal” storm activity this year. That could mean significant damage to coastal communities — some of which are still recovering from last year’s hurricane season.

As officials in hurricane-prone communities are calling on residents to be prepared for upcoming storms, researchers with the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub (CSHub) are encouraging officials to make preparation a priority from the very earliest stages of building design, starting with data-driven changes to building codes.

NASA Eyed Rainfall Rates in Tropical Storm Merbok Before Landfall
June 13, 2017 11:13 AM - NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Tropical Storm Merbok formed in the South China Sea west of the Philippines on June 11 and made landfall east of Hong Kong, China on June 12. NASA measured the rainfall rates within the tropical storm early in its short two day lifetime.

NASA Eyed Rainfall Rates in Tropical Storm Merbok Before Landfall
June 13, 2017 11:13 AM - NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Tropical Storm Merbok formed in the South China Sea west of the Philippines on June 11 and made landfall east of Hong Kong, China on June 12. NASA measured the rainfall rates within the tropical storm early in its short two day lifetime.

Understanding Multi-decadal Global Warming Rate Changes
June 13, 2017 09:54 AM - Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

A long-standing mystery is that, despite the persistently increased greenhouse gases emissions throughout the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the globally-averaged surface temperature has shown distinct multi-decadal fluctuations since 1900, including two weak global warming slowdowns in the mid-twentieth century and early twenty-first century and two strong global warming accelerations in the early and late twentieth century. The multi-decadal global warming rate changes are primarily attributed to multiple ocean surface temperature changes, according to research by CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics and Australian Bureau of Meteorology and it is the net impact of multiple ocean surface temperature changes, rather than a single ocean basin change, that plays a main driver for the multi-decadal global warming accelerations and slowdowns.

Understanding Multi-decadal Global Warming Rate Changes
June 13, 2017 09:54 AM - Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

A long-standing mystery is that, despite the persistently increased greenhouse gases emissions throughout the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the globally-averaged surface temperature has shown distinct multi-decadal fluctuations since 1900, including two weak global warming slowdowns in the mid-twentieth century and early twenty-first century and two strong global warming accelerations in the early and late twentieth century. The multi-decadal global warming rate changes are primarily attributed to multiple ocean surface temperature changes, according to research by CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics and Australian Bureau of Meteorology and it is the net impact of multiple ocean surface temperature changes, rather than a single ocean basin change, that plays a main driver for the multi-decadal global warming accelerations and slowdowns.

As Alaska's North Slope warms, greenhouse gases have nowhere to go but up
June 13, 2017 08:02 AM - NOAA

The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) being released from tundra in the northern region of Alaska during early winter has increased 70 percent since 1975, according to a new regional climate paper by scientists participating in a research project funded by NOAA and NASA.

As Alaska's North Slope warms, greenhouse gases have nowhere to go but up
June 13, 2017 08:02 AM - NOAA

The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) being released from tundra in the northern region of Alaska during early winter has increased 70 percent since 1975, according to a new regional climate paper by scientists participating in a research project funded by NOAA and NASA.

First | Previous | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | Next | Last