Climate

NASA Finds Heavy Rain in New Tropical Cyclone Hilda
December 29, 2017 10:10 AM - NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center

As Tropical Cyclone Hilda was coming together in the Southern Indian Ocean the GPM satellite analyzed its rainfall from space. 

On December 26, 2017 at 3:06 a.m. EST (0806 UTC) the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite flew above northwestern Australia and measured rainfall as Tropical Cyclone Hilda was forming along the coast

Algae on Greenland Ice Sheet Significantly Hasten Its Melting
December 28, 2017 11:21 AM - Yale Environment 360

Naturally occurring algae on Greenland’s massive ice sheet absorb large amounts of the sun’s energy and speed up the melting of the ice sheet even more than black carbon and mineral dust, according to a new study.

Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
December 28, 2017 09:53 AM - Hokkaido University

Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests.

Climate change: Self-enhancing effect cannot be explained by soil animals
December 21, 2017 04:00 PM - German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

When the soil warms up, it releases more carbon dioxide (CO2) – an effect that further fuels climate change. Until now, it had been assumed that the reason for this was mainly due to the presence of small soil animals and microorganisms that would eat and breathe more in warmer temperatures. However, a new study in Nature Climate Change has shown that this is not the case. Quite the contrary: If warmth is accompanied by drought, the soil animals eat even less. In order to improve the predictive power of climate models, it is now crucial to understand the biological processes in the soil better, say the scientists.

Climate Change Has Doubled Snowfall Around North America's Highest Peak
December 21, 2017 09:23 AM - Yale Environment 360

The amount of snow falling in Alaska’s Denali National Park, home to North America’s tallest mountain, has more than doubled over the past 150 years, according to a new study.

Climate Change Has Doubled Snowfall Around North America's Highest Peak
December 21, 2017 09:23 AM - Yale Environment 360

The amount of snow falling in Alaska’s Denali National Park, home to North America’s tallest mountain, has more than doubled over the past 150 years, according to a new study.

Continued Emissions May Cause Global North-to-South Shift in Wind Power By End of Century
December 21, 2017 08:03 AM - University of Colorado - Boulder

 In the next century, wind resources may decrease in many regions of the Northern Hemisphere and could sharply increase in some hotspot regions down south, according to a study by University of Colorado Boulder researchers. The first-of-its-kind study predicting how global wind power may shift with climate change appears today in Nature Geoscience.

Study opens window on meltwater from icebergs
December 21, 2017 08:03 AM - University of Oregon

Surface water conditions in Greenland’s fjords and in the northern Atlantic Ocean are dictated by what’s going on deep below the surface next to the massive Greenland Ice Sheet, UO-led research has found.

Breakaway icebergs, according to research findings appearing online Dec. 4 ahead of publication in the journal Nature Geoscience, are the biggest source of freshwater entering the ocean in key areas around Greenland. And the timing and location of meltwater are important factors that should be included in ocean modeling, report the paper’s six co-authors.

China Announces Details of New Carbon Trading Market
December 20, 2017 11:30 AM - Yale Environment 360

China has released plans to create the world’s largest carbon emissions trading scheme, several news outlets reported. The market will initially be focused on the power sector, which produced almost half of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions last year, and will encompass 1,700 energy suppliers producing more than 3 billion tons of CO2 annually, according to Reuters.

Texas A&M Team Making Models To Predict Droughts
December 20, 2017 11:28 AM - Leslie Lee, Texas A&M University

Drought-predicting computer models are not made just so that scientists can say “I told you so” when your favorite lake runs low. From agriculture, to infrastructure, to tourism — major sectors of the economy need a heads-up on what weather conditions are coming down the pipe.

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