Ecosystems

What's a fish native to Japan doing in the ocean off the coast of Oregon?
March 6, 2015 08:07 AM - Oregon State University

A team of scientists from Oregon State University and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is studying an unusual fish captured alive in a crab pot near Port Orford this week called a striped knifejaw that is native to Japan, as well as China and Korea.

The appearance in Oregon waters of the fish (Oplegnathus fasciatus), which is sometimes called a barred knifejaw or striped beakfish, may or may not be related to the Japanese tsunami of 2011, the researchers say, and it is premature to conclude that this non-native species may be established in Oregon waters.

But its appearance and survival certainly raises questions, according to OSU’s John Chapman, an aquatic invasive species specialist at the university’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport.

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ENN Releases App for Android Users
February 23, 2015 09:14 AM - ENN Editor

Last month ENN launched a new mobile app available at the iTunes store making it easier for you to connect with us and stay up to date with groundbreaking environmental news. Now, ENN releases the mobile app at Google Play, making it compatible for Android users.

ENN is more than just a gatherer of environmental news but rather a unique set of resources, archives, tools, and experts for the increasingly complex field of environmental science attracting readers from all levels of government, business and academia.

We also encourage you to join the conversation by checking out our Community Blog and by connecting with us on Facebook.

Apple users can download the app at the iTunes store.

Android users can download the app at Google Play.

Make sure you click on the app with the logo shown here.

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SPOTLIGHT

Why Dedicating Land to Bioenergy Won't Curb Climate Change

Guest Contributor, Tim Searchinger

This post originally was published on WRI.org.

How does bioenergy contribute to a sustainable food and climate future?

new WRI paper finds bioenergy can play a modest role using wastes and other niche fuelstocks, but recommends against dedicating land to produce bioenergy. The lesson: do not grow food or grass crops for ethanol or diesel or cut down trees for electricity.

Even modest quantities of bioenergy would greatly increase the global competition for land. People already use roughly three-quarters of the world’s vegetated land for crops, livestock grazing and wood harvests. The remaining land protects clean water, supports biodiversity and stores carbon in trees, shrubs and soils -- a benefit increasingly important for tackling climate change. The competition for land is growing, even without more bioenergy, to meet likely demands for at least 70 percent more food, forage and wood.

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Your Guide to Choosing The Best Eco-Friendly House For Your Family

February 25th, 2015
Studies show that people are becoming more aware of having an eco-friendly home. Need some help? Read on for tips to help you choose the best eco-friendly house for your family.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Sustainability Advice for Small Businesses

February 19th, 2015
People are getting better and better all the time at managing their own environmental footprints, and the effect that they have on the planet. But what about businesses? Read more to see what even the smallest of businesses can do to support sustainability.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Podcast Questions Efficiency of Energy Efficiency Policy

February 16th, 2015
In 1978 the State of California enacted the United States’ first Energy Building codes which were projected to reduce residential energy use by 80% . The United States has since centered its environmental policy on emphasizing energy efficiency.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

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