Ecosystems

Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the sea
March 30, 2017 05:26 PM - Birgitte Svennevig via University of Southern Denmark

When spring arrives in the Arctic, both snow and sea ice melt, forming melt ponds on the surface of the sea ice. Every year, as global warming increases, there are more and larger melt ponds.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Ecosystems Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

WPI, the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, and the U.S. Coast Guard Successfully Test a Novel Oil Spill Cleanup Technology
March 24, 2017 02:22 PM - Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Tests conducted this week of a novel technology that can greatly accelerate the combustion of crude oil floating on water demonstrated its potential to become an effective tool for minimizing the environmental impact of future oil spills. Called the Flame Refluxer, the technology, developed by fire protection engineering researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) with funding from the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), could make it possible to burn off spilled oil quickly while producing relatively low levels of air pollutants.

The tests of the Flame Refluxer were conducted this week by WPI and BSEE at the United States Coast Guard’s Joint Maritime Test Facility on Little Sand Island, located in Mobile Bay. WPI is the first university to work on research at the facility since it reopened in 2015. The tests involved controlled burns of oil in a specially designed test tank on the island.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Ecosystems Topic

SPOTLIGHT

5 Species Most Likely to Survive a Climate Change Disaster

Beth Buczynski, Care2

Survival of the fittest. This basic tenet of evolution explains why the dodo bird no longer exists and why humans have opposable thumbs.

Adaptation is key to survival, no matter how many fingers you’ve got. The ability to adjust to whatever conditions Mother Earth sends our way determines whether obstacles lead to extinction or to a new generation.

Human-accelerated climate change is a disaster waiting to happen. We’ve already seen the superstorms and drought it can create. Although we can work to slow climate change, there’s no way to stop it completely. This reality means adaptation will once again become the most important strategy for survival.

One thing’s for sure: the Earth will continue to exist as it has for eons. The question is, what will be left behind to inhabit it?

Below are five species known for their resilience and ability to survive in adverse conditions. They are the most likely to survive a climate change disaster. Spoiler: humans don’t make the list.

What's new on our Community Blog



Protected: How does wind turbines work?

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Protected: But what is the wind ?

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Protected: Wind Energy

September 6th, 2016
There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Member Press Releases

More Press Releases

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2017©. Copyright Environmental News Network