Ecosystems

U.S rejects stiff 2020 greenhouse goals in Bali
December 10, 2007 02:40 AM - Reuters

NUSA DUA, Indonesia (Reuters) - Washington rejected stiff 2020 targets for greenhouse gas cuts by rich nations at U.N. talks in Bali on Monday as part of a "roadmap" to work out a new global pact to fight climate change by 2009.

"It's prejudging what the outcome should be," chief negotiator Harlan Watson said of a draft suggesting that rich nations should aim to axe emissions of heat-trapping gases by between 25 and 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2020.

Dutch debate building Tulip Island in North Sea
December 9, 2007 07:24 PM - Reuters

Dubai has built Palm Island. Now the world leaders in land reclamation are considering an island in the shape of a tulip to fight overcrowding and shield the coastline from the rising sea.

Supporters of the scheme say it will give Dutch companies a chance to showcase water management skills that are increasingly in demand due to global warming, but critics say the plan will be prohibitively expensive and harm delicate ecosystems.

Al Gore sees hope in "people power"
December 9, 2007 01:40 PM - By John Acher and Wojciech Moskwa, Reuters

OSLO (Reuters) - Nobel Peace Prize winner Al Gore said on Sunday he was optimistic that a growing "people-power" movement would push the world's leaders to take action to stop global warming.

South Korea's worst oil spill blackens coast
December 8, 2007 05:35 AM - Reuters

TAEAN, South Korea (Reuters) - South Korean workers using skimmers and containment fences battled on Saturday to clean up the worst oil spill in the country's history, as the slick washed ashore near a nature preserve on the west coast.

Parts of about 17 kms (11 miles) of coastline about 100 km southwest of Seoul have already been blackened by oil, the coast guard said. More of the spill is expected on Sunday to hit the area that has marine farms and oyster beds.

Island states urge far tougher U.N. climate goals
December 8, 2007 04:37 AM - Reuters

BALI, Indonesia (Reuters) - Saying that rising seas might wipe countries off the map, small island states urged rich nations at U.N. climate talks on Saturday to axe emissions of greenhouse gases far beyond their existing plans.

"The principle must be that no island must be left behind," said Angus Friday of Grenada, chair of the 43-member alliance of small island states at December 3-14 climate talks at a beach resort in Bali looking for new ways to fight global warming.

Greenpeace urges EU and Africa to end deforestation
December 7, 2007 03:38 PM - Reuters

LISBON (Reuters) - Greenpeace urged European Union and African leaders meeting in Lisbon over the weekend to take urgent measures to stop the destruction of African forests which cause carbon emissions responsible for climate change.

"Leaders in Lisbon have to exercise political muscle and immediately support a halt to deforestation in Africa," said Stephan Van Praet, coordinator for the Greenpeace International Africa Forest Campaign.

Trees soak up carbon dioxide -- the main greenhouse gas -- as they grow and release it when they rot or are burnt.

Noted forecasters see 7 hurricanes next year
December 7, 2007 11:36 AM - Reuters

MIAMI (Reuters) - The noted Colorado State University hurricane research team predicted on Friday that 13 tropical storms will develop in the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season, of which seven would strengthen into hurricanes.

The team formed by forecasting pioneer William Gray, whose long-range forecasts have been wrong for the past three years, said that would make 2008 a "somewhat above-average" hurricane season. The long-term average is for 10 tropical storms and six hurricanes during the six-month season starting June 1.

Gray's team, now led by his protege Philip Klotzbach, said three of the hurricanes next year would be the most dangerous Category 3 or above storms, with winds of at least 111 miles per hour (178 km per hour).

'Hellish' Hot Springs Yield Greenhouse Gas-eating Bug
December 7, 2007 08:54 AM - University of Calgary

A new species of bacteria discovered living in one of the most extreme environments on Earth could yield a tool in the fight against global warming.

In a paper published on Dec. 6 in the prestigious science journal Nature, U of C biology professor Peter Dunfield and colleagues describe the methane-eating microorganism they found in the geothermal field known as Hell’s Gate, near the city of Rotorua in New Zealand. It is the hardiest “methanotrophic” bacterium yet discovered, which makes it a likely candidate for use in reducing methane gas emissions from landfills, mines, industrial wastes, geothermal power plants and other sources.

New report on deforestation reveals problems of forest carbon payment schemes
December 7, 2007 08:21 AM - Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research

BALI, INDONESIA - A new study by one of the world’s leading forestry research institutes warns that the new push to “reduce emissions from deforestation and degradation,” known by the acronym REDD, is imperiled by a routine failure to grasp the root causes of deforestation. The study sought to link what is known about the underlying causes of the loss of 13 million hectares of forest each year to the promise—and potential pitfalls—of REDD schemes.

Tanker Leaks Oil Off S.Korea Coast
December 7, 2007 05:45 AM - Reuters

SEOUL (Reuters) - A large oil tanker gushed thousands of tons of oil into the sea near one of South Korea's most scenic coastlines after being hit by a barge, South Korea's maritime ministry said on Friday.

The Hong Kong-registered Hebei Spirit was struck while at anchor off Daesan port in the Taean region on the country's west coast and the ministry said it had already leaked some 10,800 metric tons of crude oil.

"A barge ship being towed ... collided with the oil tanker at anchor, breaching the cargo section and leaking crude oil," ministry official Lee Jang-hoon told reporters.

First | Previous | 390 | 391 | 392 | 393 | 394 | Next | Last