Ecosystems

SOS for Fading Ocean Life
September 19, 2007 11:23 AM - , Worldwatch Institute

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Creating “national parks of the sea” may be the only effective way to reverse trends that have left 76 percent of world fish stocks fully- or over-exploited and marine biodiversity at severe risk, according to the new report, Oceans in Peril: Protecting Marine Biodiversity, released today by the Worldwatch Institute.

EPA Targets $2 Million to Fight Climate Change with Projects in China, Russia, Seven Other Countries
September 19, 2007 08:47 AM - EPA

Washington, D.C. - China, Russia, Argentina, Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, Nigeria and Ukraine will have projects funded under the auspices of the Methane to Markets Partnership, an international effort promoting near-term, cost-effective projects that capture and use methane as a clean-energy source.  EPA is announcing the award of $2 million for projects that will enhance the capture and use of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas twenty times more effective than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere. The primary component of natural gas, methane is also a valuable and clean-burning energy resource.

Green Groups Seek More U.S. Funds For Land Stewards
September 19, 2007 07:58 AM - Reuters

WASHINGTON - Fourteen environmental groups asked the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday to help pay for land stewardship programs now that it may provide tax credits for land preservation. Montana Democrat Max Baucus, chairman of the Finance Committee, unveiled the tax-credit idea on September 11. He said it effectively free up money for use the farm subsidy law being written this year.

Peruvians get sick from apparent meteorite crater
September 18, 2007 06:57 PM - Teresa Cespedes, Reuters

LIMA (Reuters) - Dozens of people living in a Peruvian town near Lake Titicaca reported vomiting and headaches after they went to look at a crater apparently left by a meteorite that crashed down over the weekend, health officials said on Tuesday.

After hearing a loud noise, people went to see what had happened and found a crater 65 feet wide and 22 feet deep on an uninhabited plateau near Carancas in the Puno region.

Experts from Peru's Geophysical Institute are on their way to the area 800 miles south of Lima to verify whether it was a meteorite.

"We've examined about 100 people who got near to the meteorite crater who have vomiting and headaches because of gasses coming out of there," Jorge Lopez, health director in Puno, told Reuters.

 

Powerful typhoon targets eastern China
September 18, 2007 01:01 PM -

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - A powerful typhoon targeted China's booming eastern province of Zhejiang and the nation's financial capital, Shanghai, on Tuesday, prompting evacuation of over 1.6 million people as ships were recalled to port.

Typhoon Wipha was about 300 km southeast of Wenling city at 4 a.m. EDT. With gusts of up to 198 km per hour (123 mph), it was moving northwest at 25 to 30 km per hour and should make landfall in the early hours of Wednesday, Xinhua news agency said.

"East China, including the commercial hub of Shanghai, is preparing for what may be the most destructive typhoon in a decade," the agency said.

Arctic summer ice thickness halves to 1 meter
September 18, 2007 12:54 PM - Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent, Reuters

OSLO (Reuters) - Large tracts of ice on the Arctic Ocean have halved in thickness to just 1 meter (3 ft) since 2001, making the region more accessible to ships, a researcher said on Tuesday.

"There was loose ice everywhere we went," Ursula Schauer, leader of a scientific expedition aboard the Polarstern ice-breaker, told Reuters by telephone from the Arctic Ocean north of Siberia.

"All of these areas have previously had two meters of ice," said Schauer, who works at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany, of a trip from Norway around the North Pole and back towards Russia. The last major survey was in 2001.

Saving the California Redwoods, Again
September 18, 2007 11:45 AM - Amy Arcuri and John Griffith, Special to ENN

Eureka, California - Daylight and mist chase away the last of the night’s moon shadows, revealing a fern-dominated woodland floor and a forest defined by ancient redwood trees. A sense of peace rains down from the dense canopy in showers of bird song. Centuries have passed untainted in this place. At more than 2,000 years old, Spooner has stood witness over a long era of harmony. Spooner is a redwood that lives in this beautiful grove nestled in the Nanning Creek watershed—a tributary of the Eel River. Spooner, named by those who visit it, is among the last of the unprotected giants. But just two miles away at the Pacific Lumber mill, plans are being made to see Spooner--and his ancient neighbors--chopped down and turned to lumber.

Nobel Peace Prize could go to climate campaigner
September 18, 2007 11:02 AM - Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent

OSLO (Reuters) - The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize could go to a climate campaigner such as ex-U.S. Vice-President Al Gore or Inuit activist Sheila Watt-Cloutier, reinforcing a view that global warming is a threat to world security, experts say.

The winner of the $1.5 million prize, perhaps the world's top accolade, will be announced in Oslo on October 12 from a field of 181 candidates. The prize can be split up to three ways.

"There are reasonably good chances that the peace prize will be awarded to someone working to stop the dramatic climate problems the world is facing," said Boerge Brende, a former Norwegian environment minister.

Plunder or Protection: WWF Calls For Safeguarding Coral Sea
September 18, 2007 08:08 AM - WWF

Sydney, Australia – Recognized as one of world's last tropical marine wilderness regions, WWF is calling on the Australian government to declare the entire Coral Sea region a marine protected area. The Coral Sea stretches over 780,000km2 of ocean — from the outer boundary of Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park to the South Pacific Islands of Vanuatu, New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands.

Western Canadian Pine Beetle infestation Spreads
September 18, 2007 07:30 AM - Reuters

VANCOUVER, British Columbia  - Voracious beetles that have ravaged more than 9 million hectares (35,000 square miles) of British Columbia's forests have wiped out about 40 percent of the infested region's marketable pine trees, according to a report released on Monday.

First | Previous | 392 | 393 | 394 | 395 | 396 | Next | Last