Ecosystems

Oceans seen soaking up less CO2
October 20, 2007 04:22 PM -

LONDON (Reuters) - The world's oceans appear to be soaking up less carbon dioxide, new environmental research has shown, a development that could speed up global warming.

A 10-year study by researchers from the University of East Anglia has shown that the uptake of CO2 by the North Atlantic ocean halved between the mid-1990s and 2002-2005.

Turning Grey Into Green: Greywater Recycling Systems
October 19, 2007 03:13 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Atlanta, Georgia - First a word about something called "greywater". Greywater is basically washwater. As homeowners, we make a lot of it each day. It's all wastewater excepting toilet wastes and food wastes derived from garbage grinders. No surprise, this partially used water can be re-used in your home for toilet flushing and watering gardens. Good for you, good for your water bill and good for the environment. Especially in drought stricken parts of the country like Georgia where the state's Environmental Protection Division declared a level four drought for sixty-one counties in the state.

Import and Interstate Transportation of Black Carp Banned
October 18, 2007 12:43 PM -

Washington - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today added black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) to the list of injurious fish under the Lacey Act. This action will prohibit live black carp, gametes, viable eggs and hybrids from being imported into or transported between the continental United States, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or any territory or possession of the United States.

"This is an attempt to head off a potential problem," said H. Dale Hall, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "Black carp have the potential to cause major damage to America?s native mussel populations, and we want to get out in front of the issue now. Stopping the transport of these fish is crucial to the future of our native aquatic species."

Reader's Q&A: Coral Reefs And Hybrid Cars
October 18, 2007 12:32 PM - , E Magazine

Q: I’ve heard about the die-off of coral reefs due to global warming. I’ve also read that coral reefs themselves store carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the main global warming gases. So if coral reefs are dying out, isn’t that a double whammy that increases the CO2 in the atmosphere? -- Tom Ozzello, Maplewood, MN

According to marine scientists, the world’s coral reefs—those underwater repositories for biodiversity that play host to some 25 percent of all marine life—are in big trouble as a result of global warming. Data collected by the international environmental group WWF (formerly World Wildlife Fund) show that 20 percent of the world’s coral reefs have been effectively destroyed and show no immediate sign of recovery, while about 50 percent of remaining reefs are under imminent or long-term threat of collapse.

Pact to end deforestation launched in the Amazon
October 18, 2007 12:24 PM - WWF

WWF-Brazil joined eight other Brazilian non-governmental organizations to launch a pact to reduce deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon to zero by 2015.

The pact proposes to reduce deforestation by adopting a system of reduction targets through economic mechanisms, mainly based on the payment for environmental services. It also aims to establish a wide-ranging commitment between different sectors of the government and the Brazilian society to conserve the Amazon.
 

British report calls for national marine agency
October 17, 2007 07:30 PM - Jeremy Lovell, Reuters

LONDON (Reuters) - A British parliamentary committee called on Thursday for creation of a national marine science agency to take responsibility for all aspects of the use and conservation of the seas in the light of global warming.

The report, Investigating the Oceans, from the all-party Science and Technology Committee said the new overarching agency should supersede the current inter-agency coordinating committee and greatly broaden its scope.

"The UK has the capacity to be a world leader in key aspects of marine science, such as coastal work which is vitally important because of climate change," said committee chairman Phil Willis.

EU Seeks Tough Controls on Deep-Water Trawlers
October 17, 2007 09:46 AM - Reuters, Jeremy Smith

Deep-water trawlers that fly a European Union country flag and wish to use huge nets and dredging to scoop up fish from sea beds outside EU waters may soon face far tighter rules that aim to protect the environment. As species like cod and hake become depleted in the European Union by overfishing, deep-water species such as forkbeard, orange roughy and black scabbardfish are an attractive catch as trawlers move to new fishing grounds.

Uganda scraps controversial rainforest plan
October 17, 2007 09:44 AM - Reuters

Uganda has agreed to scrap an unpopular plan to give a swath of protected rainforest to a sugar planter, the independent Daily Monitor said on Wednesday.

Government officials were not immediately available for comment on what the newspaper said was a final decision not to allow Mabira forest to be destroyed and replaced with sugarcane.

A new baseline of invasive plants in Isabela
October 17, 2007 09:32 AM - Public Library of Science

Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF) botanists have published a list of all the introduced plants growing in Puerto Villamil, Isabela Island, the third largest town in Galapagos. 261 species were recorded, 39 of which were found growing wild.

Despite 95% of the archipelago falling under the Galapagos National Park, invasive plants spreading from the inhabited areas are having large impacts on the native flora and fauna.

Canadian province to set aside caribou lands
October 16, 2007 07:28 PM -

CALGARY, Alberta (Reuters) - British Columbia on Tuesday said it will set aside hundreds of thousands of acres of old-growth forest in order to boost the Canadian province's dwindling mountain caribou herds.

The province said it will add 865,000 acres of protected lands. That will bring the total area of lands where logging and road building will be prohibited to 8,500 square miles, an area nearly the size of New Jersey that covers 95 percent of the animals' range in the province.

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