Ecosystems

Parasite Preying on Shrimp in Oregon
August 22, 2005 12:00 AM - Associated Press

Biologists are concerned about a non-native parasite that's preying on mud shrimp up and down the Oregon Coast's estuaries, potentially playing havoc with sensitive ecosystems.

Ship Zones Recommended to Help Whales
August 22, 2005 12:00 AM - Associated Press

Scientists are recommending speed zones for ship traffic as one way to help to help the endangered North Atlantic right whale population. Whale experts studying the right whale in the Bay of Fundy this summer said that while there are more calves than usual, too many of the slow-moving leviathans are being killed in ship collisions.

World Health Organization Says Dirty Air a Regular Killer in Asia
August 22, 2005 12:00 AM - Margie Mason, Associated Press

A smoky haze that shrouded parts of Southeast Asia this month, forcing schools and businesses to close, is just one element of an air pollution problem that kills hundreds of thousands of people in the region annually, the World Health Organization said.

Scientists Try to Save Rare and Randy Warbler
August 19, 2005 12:00 AM - Reuters

Europe's rarest songbird is facing extinction, despite being the most promiscuous and energetic lover in the avian world, and concerned scientists are looking urgently for ways to save it.

SE Asia Seeks Cooperation with China, Japan, South Korea on Environmental Protection
August 19, 2005 12:00 AM - Associated Press

Southeast Asian countries will work with China, Japan and South Korea to combat ecological problems like the forest fire-generated smoke haze that recently hit Indonesia and Malaysia, officials said Friday.

Coral Reef Ecosystems Found To Be in Decline in U.S. Waters
August 19, 2005 12:00 AM - John Heilprin, Associated Press

Coral reef ecosystems, among the oldest and most diverse forms of life, are declining in U.S. waters because of overfishing, climate change, marine diseases, land-based pollution, storms and grounded ships.

Commission Votes to Cap Annual Catch of Menhaden Fish in Chesapeake
August 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Matthew Barakat, Associated Press

Concerned about potential overharvesting, a regional commission has voted to limit the catch of a small but ecologically important fish in the Chesapeake Bay. Wednesday's vote by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission would curtail the annual menhaden catch in the bay to 106,000 metric tons for five years beginning in 2006.

U.S. Senators Say Global Warming Obvious in Far North
August 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Yereth Rosen, Reuters

Fresh from visits to Canada's Yukon Territory and Alaska's northernmost city, four U.S. senators said Wednesday that signs of rising temperatures on Earth are obvious and they called on Congress to act.

Groups Seek Better Electronics Recycling
August 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Terence Chea, Associated Press

Toxic waste from computers, TVs and other electronic devices discarded in the United States and dismantled in China and India is an even more severe problem than previously feared, according to environmental groups that seek better recycling programs.

Group Wants to Transplant African Animals
August 18, 2005 12:00 AM - Joseph B. Verrengia, Associated Press

Lions stalking deer in the stubble of a Nebraska corn field. Elephants trumpeting across Colorado's high plains. Prominent ecologists are floating an audacious plan that sounds like a "Jumanji" sequel -- transplant African wildlife to the Great Plains of North America.

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