Ecosystems

Penguins in peril as climate warms
December 17, 2007 02:27 PM - WWF -Climate Change

The penguin population of Antarctica is under pressure from global warming, according to a WWF report. The report, Antarctic Penguins and Climate Change, shows that the four populations of penguins that breed on the Antarctic continent — Adélie, Emperor, Chinstrap and Gentoo — are under escalating pressure. For some, global warming is taking away precious ground on which penguins raise their young. For others, food has become increasingly scarce because of warming in conjunction with overfishing.

Kicking the CO2 Habit at Climate Convention Meet
December 17, 2007 02:18 PM - UNEP

Members of the UN attending the crucial climate convention meeting in Bali today announced that they are offsetting their greenhouse gas emissions linked with travel to and from the event. The move, covering some 20 agencies, funds and programmes, also includes the Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon, and his team.

Modern Warfare Causes Unprecedented Environmental Damage
December 17, 2007 02:08 PM - , Worldwatch Institute

Washington, D.C.— Modern warfare tactics, as seen in the American war in Vietnam, the Rwandan and Congolese civil wars, and the current war in Iraq, have greatly increased our capacity to destroy the natural landscape and produce devastating environmental effects on the planet, according to Sarah DeWeerdt, author of “War and the Environment,” featured in the January/February 2008 issue of World Watch.

Indonesia's 'Lost World' reveals more surprises
December 17, 2007 09:26 AM - Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) and Indonesia Institute of Science (LIPI) scientists were accompanied by the first film crew to obtain footage of the region and its wildlife on an expedition to the Fojas in June 2007. A National Geographic photographer/scientist and a CBS News camera crew joined the team as they returned to the mountains. CI and LIPI scientists discovered dozens of new plants and animals on their first expedition to the region in late 2005. An account of the 2007 expedition was aired on the CBS News program, “60 Minutes” on Dec. 16.

Habitat loss forces India's tigers to high ground
December 17, 2007 06:01 AM - Reuters

KOLKATA, India (Reuters) - Habitat destruction is forcing India's endangered tigers to new grounds, including high mountains which have a sufficient prey base but are not known to be the natural home of the big cats.

With forests in the foothills being built over and cleared for farming, wildlife experts say tigers are being increasingly spotted in high altitudes in India's northeast and west. But they say tigers could still be as endangered in their new environment and are not as adaptable as leopards.

Saharan Dust Has Chilling Effect on North Atlantic
December 16, 2007 01:40 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Washington -- NASA satellites have provided evidence that the chilling effect of dust was responsible for one-third of the drop in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures between June 2005 and 2006, possibly contributing to the difference in hurricane activity between the two seasons.

Scientists to Monitor West Antarctica 24/7
December 16, 2007 12:19 PM - International Polar Year Newswire

COLUMBUS, Ohio—In a mission of unprecedented scale, scientists are about to cover West Antarctica with a network of sensors to monitor the interactions between the ice and the earth below—24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Studying Earthquakes in the Himalaya
December 16, 2007 11:54 AM - California Institute of Technology Newswire

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.--Scientists have long searched for what triggers earthquakes, even suggesting that tides or weather play a role. Recent research spearheaded by Jean-Philippe Avouac, professor of geology and director of the Tectonics Observatory at the California Institute of Technology, shows that in the Himalayan mountains, at least, there is indeed an earthquake season. It's winter.

New Satellite Imaging Method Tracks Earth Changes
December 16, 2007 11:48 AM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.--For the past two decades, radar images from satellites have dominated the field of geophysical monitoring for natural hazards like earthquakes, volcanoes, or landslides. These images reveal small perturbations precisely, but large changes from events like big earthquake ruptures or fast-moving glaciers remained difficult to assess from afar, until now.

 

 

 

 

One dead, five infected with bird flu in Pakistan
December 15, 2007 12:27 PM - Alistair Scrutton, Reuters

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) - Pakistan has recorded its first human death from bird flu and five other people have been infected with the deadly H5N1 virus, the Health Ministry said on Saturday.

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