Ecosystems

Irish funding fertilises Malawian tree project
October 22, 2007 02:29 PM - Charles Mkoka

Malawi has begun its four-year 'fertiliser trees' project to reduce the reliance of subsistence farmers on expensive fertilisers.

The Agro-forestry Food Security Programme has received €1 million (US$1.4 million) in funds from the government of Ireland and commenced last month (September) to coincide with the rainy season.

Under the programme, farmers are being encouraged to plant particular shrubs with their crops to improve the soil through nitrogen fixation (see Malawi to roll out 'fertiliser trees' project).

France Gondwe, of the World Agroforestry Centre in Lilongwe, Malawi, said the project is scaling up a farming practice that over 100,000 Malawian farmers had been using for the last ten years.

 

 

 

 

Jolie, Pitt Spotlight Aid Workers In Documentary Series
October 22, 2007 10:49 AM - Nellie Andreeva

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt are making their first joint producing effort with an HBO series about aid workers.

The untitled drama will explore the behind-the scenes politics of an international aid organization, and chronicle the lives of humanitarian workers assigned to dangerous zones and the needy people they assist.

Jolie and Pitt will serve as executive producers, along with Scott Burns, who will write the pilot. Burns co-wrote "The Bourne Ultimatum" and was a producer of "An Inconvenient Truth."

Angling for iron ore in China's streams
October 22, 2007 09:24 AM - Reuters

It may not have the allure of trout fishing, but Chinese farmers are cashing in on the world metals boom by fishing with magnets for lumps of iron ore in local streams.

"It sounds unbelievable, but it really happens in many mining areas, including mine," a manager of a mine in the eastern province of Anhui said.

 

Georgia declares state of emergency over drought
October 21, 2007 10:45 PM -

ATLANTA (Reuters) - Georgia has declared a state of emergency over its worst drought in decades and appealed to President George W. Bush for federal aid, newspapers said on Sunday.

Low rainfall in the Southeastern United States has caused a drought in several states, including swaths of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and North and South Carolina.

Gov. Sonny Perdue asked Bush to issue a federal disaster designation for the drought-affected parts of the state that would empower him to order less water released from Lake Sidney Lanier and make federal funds available to state and local governments.

It would also enable low interest loans to be offered to Georgia businesses hurt by the drought, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Bush Poses With Bird, Touts "conservation"
October 20, 2007 06:37 PM - Chris Baltimore

ST MICHAELS, Maryland (Reuters) - President George W. Bush took a nature outing on Saturday to tout new federal initiatives aimed at protecting migrating birds and two fish species prized by anglers.

Bush took a break from bruising battles with Democrats in Congress over his agenda on children's health care, domestic spying, the budget and the war in Iraq to walk around a wildlife preserve in the scenic Maryland countryside.

He later headed to Chesapeake Bay to sign an executive order to protect striped bass and red drum fish -- two once-abundant species that have faced over-fishing.

Oceans seen soaking up less CO2
October 20, 2007 04:22 PM -

LONDON (Reuters) - The world's oceans appear to be soaking up less carbon dioxide, new environmental research has shown, a development that could speed up global warming.

A 10-year study by researchers from the University of East Anglia has shown that the uptake of CO2 by the North Atlantic ocean halved between the mid-1990s and 2002-2005.

Turning Grey Into Green: Greywater Recycling Systems
October 19, 2007 03:13 PM - Paul Schaefer, ENN

Atlanta, Georgia - First a word about something called "greywater". Greywater is basically washwater. As homeowners, we make a lot of it each day. It's all wastewater excepting toilet wastes and food wastes derived from garbage grinders. No surprise, this partially used water can be re-used in your home for toilet flushing and watering gardens. Good for you, good for your water bill and good for the environment. Especially in drought stricken parts of the country like Georgia where the state's Environmental Protection Division declared a level four drought for sixty-one counties in the state.

Import and Interstate Transportation of Black Carp Banned
October 18, 2007 12:43 PM -

Washington - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today added black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) to the list of injurious fish under the Lacey Act. This action will prohibit live black carp, gametes, viable eggs and hybrids from being imported into or transported between the continental United States, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or any territory or possession of the United States.

"This is an attempt to head off a potential problem," said H. Dale Hall, Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. "Black carp have the potential to cause major damage to America?s native mussel populations, and we want to get out in front of the issue now. Stopping the transport of these fish is crucial to the future of our native aquatic species."

Reader's Q&A: Coral Reefs And Hybrid Cars
October 18, 2007 12:32 PM - , E Magazine

Q: I’ve heard about the die-off of coral reefs due to global warming. I’ve also read that coral reefs themselves store carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the main global warming gases. So if coral reefs are dying out, isn’t that a double whammy that increases the CO2 in the atmosphere? -- Tom Ozzello, Maplewood, MN

According to marine scientists, the world’s coral reefs—those underwater repositories for biodiversity that play host to some 25 percent of all marine life—are in big trouble as a result of global warming. Data collected by the international environmental group WWF (formerly World Wildlife Fund) show that 20 percent of the world’s coral reefs have been effectively destroyed and show no immediate sign of recovery, while about 50 percent of remaining reefs are under imminent or long-term threat of collapse.

Pact to end deforestation launched in the Amazon
October 18, 2007 12:24 PM - WWF

WWF-Brazil joined eight other Brazilian non-governmental organizations to launch a pact to reduce deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon to zero by 2015.

The pact proposes to reduce deforestation by adopting a system of reduction targets through economic mechanisms, mainly based on the payment for environmental services. It also aims to establish a wide-ranging commitment between different sectors of the government and the Brazilian society to conserve the Amazon.
 

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