Ecosystems

Fisheries Scientists to Reap Benefits from New NOAA Satellite
November 29, 2017 08:17 AM - NOAA

Environmental satellites are a forecaster’s best friend. Orbiting high above the planet, these “eyes in the sky” watch for extreme weather and climate conditions that threaten lives and property.

Radioactivity Lingers from 1946-1958 Nuclear Bomb Tests
November 28, 2017 02:22 PM - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Scientists have found lingering radioactivity in the lagoons of remote Marshall Island atolls in the Pacific Ocean where the United States conducted 66 nuclear weapons tests in the 1940s and 1950s.

 

As climate warms, mice morph
November 28, 2017 01:40 PM - McGill University

New research by McGill University biologists shows that milder winters have led to physical alterations in two species of mice in southern Quebec in the past 50 years – providing a textbook example of the consequences of climate change for small mammals.

Disrupting sensitive soils could make climate change worse, Stanford researchers find
November 28, 2017 01:32 PM - Stanford University

Nearly a third of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere annually can be traced back to bacteria living in the soil, where they break down plant and animal matter for energy.

Brazilian Ethanol Can Replace 13.7% of World's Crude Oil Consumption
November 28, 2017 12:47 PM - Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

Expansion of sugarcane cultivation in Brazil for ethanol production in areas not under environmental protection or reserved for food production could potentially replace up to 13.7% of world crude oil consumption and reduce global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) by as much as 5.6% by 2045.

Where Corn Is King, the Stirrings of a Renaissance in Small Grains
November 28, 2017 12:11 PM - Yale Environment 360

To the untrained eye, Jeremy Gustafson’s 1,600-acre farm looks like all the others spread out across Iowa. Gazing at his conventional corn and soybean fields during a visit in June, I was hard-pressed to say where his neighbor’s tightly planted row crops ended and Gustafson’s began.

Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula Reveals a Cryptic Methane-Fueled Ecosystem
November 28, 2017 11:05 AM - US Geological Survey

In the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, scientists have found a cryptic world in its own right.

Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula Reveals a Cryptic Methane-Fueled Ecosystem
November 28, 2017 11:05 AM - US Geological Survey

In the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, scientists have found a cryptic world in its own right.

In Harm's Way
November 27, 2017 04:11 PM - University of California - Santa Barbara

How safe is the water you drink? For the 45 million Americans who get their drinking water from private groundwater wells rather than a public utility, the answer is decidedly murky. The Environmental Protection Agency regulations that protect public drinking water systems don’t apply to privately owned wells, leaving owners responsible for ensuring their water is safe from contaminants.

Maize pest exploits plant defense compounds to protect itself
November 27, 2017 02:35 PM - Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

The western corn rootworm continues to be on the rise in Europe. Why attempts to biologically target this crop pest by applying entomopathogenic nematodes have failed, can now be explained by the amazing defense strategy of this insect. In their new study, scientists from the University of Bern, Switzerland, and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, show that the rootworm larvae are able to sequester plant defense compounds from maize roots in a non-toxic form and can activate the toxins whenever they need them to protect themselves against their own enemies. (eLife, November 2017, DOI: 10.7554/eLife.29307.001)

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