Ecosystems

NASA Scientist Studies Whether Solar Storms Cause Animal Beachings
February 2, 2017 11:56 AM - NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center

A long-standing mystery among marine biologists is why otherwise healthy whales, dolphins, and porpoises — collectively known as cetaceans — end up getting stranded along coastal areas worldwide. Could severe solar storms, which affect Earth’s magnetic fields, be confusing their internal compasses and causing them to lose their way?

Genetically modified insects could disrupt international food trade
February 1, 2017 12:10 PM - Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Genetically modified organisms for pest control could end up as contaminants in agricultural products throughout the globe.

 

Coastal Wetlands Excel at Storing Carbon
February 1, 2017 10:21 AM - University of Maryland

In the global effort to mitigate carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, all options are on the table—including help from nature. Recent research suggests that healthy, intact coastal wetland ecosystems such as mangrove forests, tidal marshes and seagrass meadows are particularly good at drawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it for hundreds to thousands of years.

Increasing factory and auto emissions disrupt natural cycle in East China Sea
February 1, 2017 09:54 AM - University of California - Irvine

China’s rapid ascent to global economic superpower is taking a toll on some of its ancient ways. For millennia, people have patterned their lives and diets around the vast fisheries of the East China Sea, but now those waters are increasingly threatened by human-caused, harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

“There has been massive growth in emissions from China’s factories and cars over the past few decades, and what comes out of the smokestacks and tailpipes tends to be richer in nitrogen than phosphorus,” said Katherine Mackey, assistant professor of Earth system science at UCI and lead author of the study, published recently in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Asian grass carp pose ecological threat to Great Lakes
February 1, 2017 08:29 AM - University of Toronto

Asian grass carp pose a significant ecological threat to the Great Lakes and that threat could be extreme over the next 50 years.

This is the major finding of a large binational risk assessment authored by a team of American and Canadian researchers, including Nick Mandrak, associate professor of biological sciences at U of T Scarborough.

Asian grass carp pose ecological threat to Great Lakes
February 1, 2017 08:29 AM - University of Toronto

Asian grass carp pose a significant ecological threat to the Great Lakes and that threat could be extreme over the next 50 years.

This is the major finding of a large binational risk assessment authored by a team of American and Canadian researchers, including Nick Mandrak, associate professor of biological sciences at U of T Scarborough.

Colorado's wildfire-stricken forests showing limited recovery
January 31, 2017 09:45 AM - University of Colorado Boulder

Colorado forests stricken by wildfire are not regenerating as well as expected and may partially transform into grasslands and shrublands in coming decades, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study.

Colorado's wildfire-stricken forests showing limited recovery
January 31, 2017 09:45 AM - University of Colorado Boulder

Colorado forests stricken by wildfire are not regenerating as well as expected and may partially transform into grasslands and shrublands in coming decades, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study.

Role of terrestrial biosphere in counteracting climate change may have been underestimated
January 30, 2017 11:41 AM - University of Birmingham

New research suggests that the capacity of the terrestrial biosphere to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2) may have been underestimated in past calculations due to certain land-use changes not being fully taken into account.

Scientists explain how meltwater reaches ocean depths
January 30, 2017 11:27 AM - British Antartic Survey

An international team of researchers has discovered why fresh water, melted from Antarctic ice sheets, is often detected below the surface of the ocean, rather than rising to the top above denser seawater. The team found that the Earth’s rotation influences the way meltwater behaves – keeping it at depths of several hundred metres. The research is published this week in the journal Nature in association with colleagues at University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, University of East Anglia (UEA), British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and Stockholm University.

First | Previous | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | Next | Last