Ecosystems

Great Barrier Reef building coral under threat from poisonous seaweed
February 3, 2017 09:45 AM - Griffith University

World-first research on the Great Barrier Reef has shown how ‘weed-like’ algae will kill vital coral because of increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere.

Great Barrier Reef building coral under threat from poisonous seaweed
February 3, 2017 09:45 AM - Griffith University

World-first research on the Great Barrier Reef has shown how ‘weed-like’ algae will kill vital coral because of increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere.

Protected Nature Areas Protect People, Too
February 3, 2017 08:04 AM - Michigan State University

A group of scientists is recommending giving the world’s nature reserves a makeover to defend not only flora and fauna, but people, too.

Scientists in this week’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argue that the world’s protected areas such as nature reserves, traditionally havens for endangered animals and plants, can be made better if they ratchet up benefits that directly help people. The world’s nature reserves not only defend nature for nature’s sake, but also can curb erosion, prevent sandstorms, retain water and prevent flooding and sequester carbon. The authors include more of a place for people – judiciously.

Scientists Report on Latest Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Impacts
February 2, 2017 02:39 PM - Louisiana State University

LSU scientists will present new research at the 2017 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference in New Orleans next week. These experts will be among hundreds of oil spill-related researchers from academia, state and federal agencies, non-governmental organizations and industry, who will share the latest oil spill and ecosystem scientific discoveries, innovations, technologies and policies on Feb. 6-9.

NASA Scientist Studies Whether Solar Storms Cause Animal Beachings
February 2, 2017 11:56 AM - NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center

A long-standing mystery among marine biologists is why otherwise healthy whales, dolphins, and porpoises — collectively known as cetaceans — end up getting stranded along coastal areas worldwide. Could severe solar storms, which affect Earth’s magnetic fields, be confusing their internal compasses and causing them to lose their way?

Genetically modified insects could disrupt international food trade
February 1, 2017 12:10 PM - Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

Genetically modified organisms for pest control could end up as contaminants in agricultural products throughout the globe.

 

Coastal Wetlands Excel at Storing Carbon
February 1, 2017 10:21 AM - University of Maryland

In the global effort to mitigate carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere, all options are on the table—including help from nature. Recent research suggests that healthy, intact coastal wetland ecosystems such as mangrove forests, tidal marshes and seagrass meadows are particularly good at drawing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it for hundreds to thousands of years.

Increasing factory and auto emissions disrupt natural cycle in East China Sea
February 1, 2017 09:54 AM - University of California - Irvine

China’s rapid ascent to global economic superpower is taking a toll on some of its ancient ways. For millennia, people have patterned their lives and diets around the vast fisheries of the East China Sea, but now those waters are increasingly threatened by human-caused, harmful algal blooms that choke off vital fish populations, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

“There has been massive growth in emissions from China’s factories and cars over the past few decades, and what comes out of the smokestacks and tailpipes tends to be richer in nitrogen than phosphorus,” said Katherine Mackey, assistant professor of Earth system science at UCI and lead author of the study, published recently in Frontiers in Marine Science.

Asian grass carp pose ecological threat to Great Lakes
February 1, 2017 08:29 AM - University of Toronto

Asian grass carp pose a significant ecological threat to the Great Lakes and that threat could be extreme over the next 50 years.

This is the major finding of a large binational risk assessment authored by a team of American and Canadian researchers, including Nick Mandrak, associate professor of biological sciences at U of T Scarborough.

Asian grass carp pose ecological threat to Great Lakes
February 1, 2017 08:29 AM - University of Toronto

Asian grass carp pose a significant ecological threat to the Great Lakes and that threat could be extreme over the next 50 years.

This is the major finding of a large binational risk assessment authored by a team of American and Canadian researchers, including Nick Mandrak, associate professor of biological sciences at U of T Scarborough.

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