Energy

Judge: Reduce CO2 Or Don't Build Coal Plant
July 1, 2008 10:49 AM - TheDailyGreen

In a ruling believed to be unprecedented, a Georgia judge halted the construction of Dynegy's Longleaf coal-fired power plant because it had not made provisions for reducing its emissions of carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas most widely implicated in man-made global warming. The judge ruled that the plant must limit its pollution, according to the Sierra Club, which has been waging a campaign against Dynegy, an energy company with plans to build more coal-fired power plants than any other.

Solar Water Heaters Now Mandatory In Hawaii
June 30, 2008 08:11 AM - , MetaEfficient

Hawaii has become the first state to require solar water heaters in new homes. The bill was signed into law by Governor Linda Lingle, a Republican. It requires the energy-saving systems in homes starting in 2010. It prohibits issuing building permits for single-family homes that do not have solar water heaters.

Beating the Oil Barons
June 27, 2008 10:28 AM - , Global Policy Innovations Program

Over the past eighteen months, oil prices have more than doubled, inflicting huge costs on the global economy. Strong global demand, owing to emerging economies like China, has undoubtedly fueled some of the price increase. But the scale of the price spike exceeds normal demand and supply factors, pointing to the role of speculation—and underscoring the need for policy action to clean up the oil market.

Greenpeace crashes coal meeting using phony front
June 27, 2008 09:50 AM - Reuters

Greenpeace posed as a pro-coal organization to become a sponsor of the 2008 McCloskey Coal USA conference, which was surprised but allowed them to deliver a brief anti-coal message, officials said Friday. When The McCloskey Group figured out who the Institute for Energy Solutions really were, they decided to let Greenpeace have their booth under the phone name and make brief remarks, organizers said.

New "carbon revolution" urged to slow warming

The world needs a shift as radical as the Industrial Revolution to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 while safeguarding economic growth, the McKinsey Global Institute said on Thursday.

North America's 1st carbon tax rolls out under fire
June 27, 2008 09:07 AM - Reuters

Civic leader Scott Nelson says he is as worried as anyone about global warming, but that does not make him happy to be one of the first North Americans to pay a carbon tax to curb climate change. Nelson, mayor of Williams Lake, British Columbia, says record high energy prices mean that the levy, for all its good intentions, could not come at a worst time for residents in his community, a lumber and ranching town about 525 km (340 miles) north of Vancouver.

Grow your own
June 24, 2008 10:03 AM - LexisNexus

Buried in the news a few weeks ago was an announcement by a small Californian firm called Amyris. It was, perhaps, a parable for the future of biotechnology. Amyris is famous in the world of tropical medicine for applying the latest biotechnological tools to the manufacture of artemisinin, an antimalarial drug that is normally extracted from a Chinese vine.

Buckminster Fuller takes on big coal
June 23, 2008 09:14 AM - University of Vermont

In the quest for coal, over a million and a half acres of Appalachia have been strip-mined, whole mountains removed, trillions of gallons of toxic slurry left behind, and communities devastated. Not exactly a promising place for a new green economy to arise.

Nuclear Prospects Unclear
June 23, 2008 09:10 AM - , Worldwatch Institute

Global nuclear power capacity grew by less than 2,000 megawatts in 2007, a figure equivalent to just one-tenth of the new wind power installed globally last year, according to the latest Vital Signs Update from the Worldwatch Institute. Global nuclear capacity stands at 372,000 megawatts, but ranks as the slowest growing energy source-just 0.5 percent in 2007, compared to wind at 27 percent.

Study questions method of listing fuel efficiency

Listing vehicle fuel efficiency in "gallons per mile" instead "miles per gallon" would allow consumers to better understand potential fuel savings when they shop for a new car, according to a study released today. The Duke University study, published in Science magazine, says listing fuel efficiency in its current form leads consumers to assume fuel consumption drops at an even rate as efficiency improves. It doesn't.

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