Energy

E.ON takes first step into U.S. renewables market
October 4, 2007 01:44 PM - Reuters

FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Germany's E.ON (EONG.DE: Quote, Profile, Research), the world's largest utility, is taking its first step into the U.S. market for renewable energy with the takeover of wind farms there for $1.4 billion including debt.

With the acquisition of the American division of Ireland's Airtricity, E.ON is buying current and future projects with a total capacity of more than 7,000 megawatts in the United States and Canada, the German company said in a statement on Thursday.

"E.ON is late in renewables, but it makes clear it's strongly committed to picking up," London-based UBS analyst Per Lekander said. "Valuations in the area are high and can only be justified by the expectation of future projects."

Another warm winter seen for much of U.S.
October 4, 2007 01:31 PM - Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Long-range weather forecasts are predicting a warmer than average winter with less precipitation for much of the United States except the Pacific Northwest.

"It will be a lot like last year but the climate models are even more in agreement now than they were last fall," said Mike Halpert, head of forecast operations at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center.

"Temperatures will be warmer than average in most places except the northwest of the country, which could see some cold."

Forecasters believe the emergence of a La Nina condition -- unusually cold ocean temperatures in the equatorial Pacific Ocean -- will be the main factor behind the anticipated warmth for much of North America.

World's Most Boring TV Show to Measure Energy Use
October 4, 2007 01:02 PM - Reuters

CU Researchers Shed Light on Light-Emitting Nanodevice
October 4, 2007 08:23 AM - Cornell University

An interdisciplinary team of Cornell nanotechnology researchers has unraveled some of the fundamental physics of a material that holds promise for light-emitting, flexible semiconductors.  The discovery, which involved years of perfecting a technique for building a specific type of light-emitting device, is reported in the Sept. 30 online publication of the journal Nature Materials.  The interdisciplinary team had long studied the molecular semiconductor ruthenium tris-bipyridine. 

Make Hay (and a lot more) While The Sun Shines
October 4, 2007 08:19 AM - MIT

A team of MIT students, faculty and volunteers has taken on the challenge of designing and building a house that relies entirely on solar energy to meet the electricity needs of a typical American family, from drying towels to cooking dinner.  MIT's off-grid home, known as Solar7, is en route to the capital now. Designed and built at MIT on an asphalt lot at the corner of Albany and Portland Streets in Cambridge, Solar7 was broken into modules and sent off by flatbed truck.

Power Utility Wants Auctioning of CO2 Permits by 2020
October 4, 2007 07:45 AM - Reuters

U.S. promotes swap to energy-saving light bulbs
October 3, 2007 06:48 PM - Tom Doggett, Reuters

WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday kicked off a campaign to get U.S. consumers to switch to energy-efficient light bulbs as a way of reducing energy spending and greenhouse gas emissions.

The EPA's "Change-a-Light, Change-the-World" bus tour will travel to 10 U.S. cities this month to promote Energy Star light bulbs that use about 75 percent less electricity than standard incandescent light bulbs and last up to 10 times longer.

The government puts the Energy Star label on light bulbs, appliances and other products that save energy.

The agency wants every U.S. household to change at least one traditional bulb to an Energy Star bulb, collectively saving $600 million a year in energy costs and preventing enough greenhouse gas emissions to equal what is spewed from the tailpipes of 800,000 cars.

Coal "Whipping Boy" For Greens Complaims Coal Exec
October 3, 2007 03:35 PM - Steve James, Reuters

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The coal industry has become the "whipping boy" of environmentalists who fail to come up with realistic alternatives for energy, the head of one of America's biggest coal producers said.

Brett Harvey, chief executive of Consol Energy Inc (CNX.N: Quote, Profile, Research) also suggested a surcharge on electricity use to help pay for development of technology that makes coal burn off less carbon dioxide and converts the fossil fuel into liquids and gas.

"If you're not going to use coal anymore what are you going to use?" he said he asks anti-coal advocates. "Well, they respond to you: new technology, solar and wind.

EPA Urged To Limit CO2 Pollution From Cargo And Cruise Ships
October 3, 2007 12:04 PM -

Washington, D.C., - A US supreme court decision has cleared the way for the Environmental Protection AGency to order shipping companies to lower the pollution caused by ships.

Today a coalition of environmental advocates filed a petition today with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), asking the agency to set pollution rules for large, ocean-going marine vessels. These vessels include cargo and cruise ships. Earthjustice, the leading U.S. public interest environmental law firm, filed this first ever petition on behalf of Oceana, Friends of the Earth and the Center for Biological Diversity.

California Attorney General Edmund G. “Jerry” Brown, Jr. also filed a petition to U.S. EPA Administrator Stephen L. Johnson on behalf of the state of California today, with a similar request.

The petitions would require the EPA to assess ships’ contributions to global warming, seek public comment and issue rules to reduce this pollution or explain why it will not act. 

US Backs NKorea Nuclear Facilities Plan
October 3, 2007 08:30 AM - Jennifer Loven -Associated Press

The United States on Wednesday lauded an agreement for North Korea to acknowledge its nuclear programs and disable all activities at its main reactor complex, with the White House calling it significant progress toward a denuclearized Korean Peninsula.

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