Energy

NREL Research Yields Significant Thermoelectric Performance
November 1, 2017 08:44 AM - DOE / National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

NREL Research Yields Significant Thermoelectric Performance
November 1, 2017 08:44 AM - DOE / National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reported significant advances in the thermoelectric performance of organic semiconductors based on carbon nanotube thin films that could be integrated into fabrics to convert waste heat into electricity or serve as a small power source.

New Study Suggests the United States' Power Supply Has the Capacity to be More Adaptable to Climate Change than Previously Predicted
October 30, 2017 12:34 PM - Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

Climate change scientists warn that the continued burning of fossil fuels is likely to cause major disruptions to the global climate system leading to more extreme weather, sea level rise, and biodiversity loss. The changes also will compromise our capacity to generate electricity. In recent decades, capacity losses at United States power plants occurred infrequently, but scientists warn that the warming climate may increase their regularity and magnitude. This instability could interrupt power supply to homes, hospitals, transportation systems, and other critical institutions and infrastructure at a potentially high financial cost.

Building a Sustainable Future: Urgent Action Needed
October 30, 2017 11:43 AM - Cambridge University Press

We need to act urgently to increase the energy efficiency of our buildings as the world’s emerging middle classes put increasing demands on our planet’s energy resources. These are the findings of a new report, published in MRS Energy & Sustainability by authors Matthias M. Koebel, Jannis Wernery and Wim J. Malfait.

How cities can fight climate change most effectively
October 30, 2017 11:25 AM - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

What are the best ways for U.S. cities to combat climate change? A new study co-authored by an MIT professor indicates it will be easier for cities to reduce emissions coming from residential energy use rather than from local transportation — and this reduction will happen mostly thanks to better building practices, not greater housing density.

New Research Findings Could Lead to Safer and More Powerful Lithium-Ion Batteries
October 27, 2017 03:26 PM - Virginia Commonwealth University

Virginia Commonwealth University researchers are working to improve conductivity and safety in lithium-ion batteries, which are used to power many electronic devices around the world, including laptops, iPods, satellites, artificial hearts and cell phones.

New technology capable of converting waste into bio-energy coming to University of Alberta
October 26, 2017 08:13 AM - University of Alberta

A shipping container-sized pilot plant that can process a variety of wastes into valuable biofuels will be shipped from Germany to Edmonton thanks to a new future energy research collaboration between the University of Alberta and Germany’s Fraunhofer Society.

The plant, known as Biobattery, uses thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR) technology developed by Fraunhofer bioengineering researcher Andreas Hornung to process a variety of wastes into three valuable products––bio-oil, char and gases––at a rate of 30 kilograms per hour.

New Fractal-Like Concentrating Solar Power Receivers Are Better at Absorbing Sunlight
October 25, 2017 11:57 AM - DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories engineers have developed new fractal-like, concentrating solar power receivers for small- to medium-scale use that are up to 20 percent more effective at absorbing sunlight than current technology.

The fungus among us
October 25, 2017 08:20 AM - University of Saskatchewan

“The current methods of restoring these sites are not as cost efficient or energy efficient as they could be, and can cause more environmental disruption,” said Susan Kaminskyj, a professor in the Department of Biology. “Our biotech innovation should help to solve this type of problem faster and with less additional disturbance.”

Kaminskyj led a research team that included three biology students and a post-doctoral fellow in the U of S College of Arts and Science. Results from their work, funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, were published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissions
October 24, 2017 11:20 AM - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Vastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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