Get the ENN
mobile app

iOS Android



Enn Original News

Lower Ozone levels in Houston linked to climate change
May 17, 2015 07:48 AM - Universtiy of Houston via ScienceDaily

Researchers at the University of Houston have determined that climate change -- in the form of a stronger sea breeze, the result of warmer soil temperatures -- contributed to the drop in high-ozone days in the Houston area.

Robert Talbot, professor of atmospheric chemistry, said that also should be true for coastal regions globally.

The researchers describe their findings in a paper published this week in the journal Atmosphere. In addition to Talbot, they include first author Lei Liu, a doctoral student, and post-doctoral fellow Xin Lan.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Pollution Topic

ADVERTISEMENT

No Sunscreen Needed
May 12, 2015 08:47 AM - ENN Editor

With summer sun right around the corner, it is important to be prepared and protect our skin from those potentially harmful rays. Whether you use sunscreen or set up an umbrella for shade at the beach, we should be proactive so we don't get sun-burn.

For us, we take precautions, but how do the rest of the animal kingdom fare? How can animal species spend their whole lives outdoors with no apparent concern about high levels of solar exposure?

According to researchers from Oregon State University, animals make their own sunscreen.

The findings, published in the journal eLife, found that many fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds can naturally produce a compound called gadusol, which among other biologic activities provides protection from the ultraviolet, or sun-burning component of sunlight.

The researchers also believe that this ability may have been obtained through some prehistoric, natural genetic engineering.

» Read Full Article
» Read More from Wildlife Topic

SPOTLIGHT

America's Greenest Cities

Courtney Miller, NerdWallet

A solid majority, 71% of Americans, believe the country “should do whatever it takes to protect the environment,” according to a 2014 poll by the Pew Research Center.

This strong public interest in our environment extends to urban living, prompting NerdWallet’s curiosity: Even though we all know that the city we live in influences our transportation and energy choices, how do environmental impacts differ across the U.S.?

We explored the data for the nation’s 150 largest cities to shed light on the best places for those seeking a green lifestyle and a healthy environment.

So what cities made the cut? Click to find out!

What's new on our Community Blog



Once Lawn’s Ally, Clover Rebranded as Unwelcome Invader

May 21st, 2015
With winter’s grudging departure, the season when many homeowners quest for the perfect, uniform, green lawn -- their own shimmering Holy Grail – has finally arrived! But what makes for a perfect lawn? What is it about grass that merits such reverence, such tender nurturing, such expense! And what makes a weed, a weed, and thus deserving of the ultimate punishment?
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

The NASA Guide to Air-filtering Houseplants

May 19th, 2015
With so much time being spent indoors, it's important to ensure clean air. With the addition of some regular houseplants, indoor greenery can help filter harmful toxins and pollutants from the air. Find out what's in our air and some indoor plant suggestions here!
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

8 of the Strangest Allergy Cures

May 13th, 2015
While nothing compares to the beauty of mother nature in full spring bloom, for those of us that suffer from seasonal allergies, we cannot wait for spring to move on. To help combat your allergies this season, check out these 8 strange cures from around the world.
To read the full post and comment, visit the ENN Community Blog

Terms of Use | Privacy Policy

2015©. Copyright Environmental News Network